Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Chris , please.

  1. #1
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    868
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Chris , please.

    When I went to an English leaning centre to pick up my child, I saw a parent showed his pick-up pass to the English tutor. Then the parent say "Chris, Please." (Chris is the name of his child. Please note that Chris is a false name).

    I wonder if it is natural to say "please" after the child's name. Is it impolite to just say the children's name?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    When I went to an English learning centre to pick up my child, I saw a parent showed show his pick-up pass to the English tutor. Then the parent say "Chris, Please." (Chris is the name of his child. Please note that Chris is a false name.)

    I wonder if it is natural to say "please" after the child's name. Is it impolite to just say the children's child's name?

    Thanks.
    As far as I can tell, the parent was saying "I am here to collect Chris. Please bring him to me/Please call for him to come out to me" or something similar. I'm not sure what a pick-up pass is, but I assume it's something to show the teacher that the adult has permission to collect that particular child.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    868
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm not sure what a pick-up pass is, but I assume it's something to show the teacher that the adult has permission to collect that particular child.
    Thanks ems.

    Yes, a pick-up pass is used to show the teacher that the adult has permission to collect that particular child.

    Is it unnatural, if we just say the child's name?

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks ems.

    Yes, a pick-up pass is used to show the teacher that the adult has permission to collect that particular child.

    Is it unnatural, if we just say the child's name?
    Not unnatural, but it would seem a little abrupt (even rude) to just go up to the teacher and say "Chris".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    868
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Not unnatural, but it would seem a little abrupt (even rude) to just go up to the teacher and say "Chris".
    Thanks ems.

    Other than "Chris, please", what else can we say if we go up to the teacher?

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    I would expect something like "Hi, I'm here to pick up Chris".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    I say, "Hello, I'm here for Frantek" when I pick up my honorary grandson from nursery school.

  8. #8
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    868
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would expect something like "Hi, I'm here to pick up Chris".
    Hi ems and 5jj.

    One thing I forgot to say. When the class finishes, the parents need to line up outside the classroom. Then the parents show their pick-up passes to the teacher one by one and say their children's name. When the teacher sees the pick-up passes, the teacher calls out the children's name. Then the children would come out.

    In this case, do we need to say "Chris, please","Hi, I'm here to pick up Chris" or "Hello, I'm here for Frantek" when we show our pick-up passes to the teacher? Is it impolite to say "Chris" when we show our pick-up passes to the teacher . Please note there are around fifteen parents quening up to pick up their children.

    I am very sorry to have wasted your precious time.

    Thank you very much for your kindness.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 06-Apr-2013 at 22:44.

  9. #9
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    What is considered polite will depend on the culture in which this is taking place. If I were in that situation, I would feel impolite if I did not greet the teacher in some way, however short (Hi) and say why I was there, even if in only two words (Chris, please).

  10. #10
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Chris , please.

    Why don't you stand at the back of the queue and listen carefully to how every other parent speaks to the teacher? That should give you a good idea of what the accepted way of speaking is.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-Sep-2012, 09:59
  2. Chris 02320618 My cover letter and resume.
    By sunwenyu_25 in forum CVs, Resumes and Applications
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-Oct-2004, 22:43
  3. Chris 02320618: How to write the address properly?
    By sunwenyu_25 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Oct-2004, 17:09

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •