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    Default ɒ, the counterpart to ɔ in AmE?

    I think /ɒ/ as in not, hot, cot in BrE is the counterpart to /ɔ/ as in call, ball, hall in AmE.
    I watched the video of /ɒ/ pronunciation, and it was showing making round lips to make the sound, which is similar to American /ɔ/.
    For both /ɒ/ and /ɔ/, do they actually round their lips or in many cases, just pronounce it simiar to schwa /ə/? If you speak fast, you wouldn't make a difference between /ɒ/or /ɔ/ and /ə/, as rounding lips would reduce speech speed.

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    Default Re: ɒ, the counterpart to ɔ in AmE?

    Maybe I asked too many questions. Please just answer me about if they round their lips for /ɒ/ or it is similar to schwa.

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    Default Re: ɒ, the counterpart to ɔ in AmE?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Maybe I asked too many questions.
    No. The problem is that your first sentence, "I think /ɒ/ as in not, hot, cot in BrE is the counterpart to /ɔ/ as in call, ball, hall in AmE." is not clear. For nearly all speakers of BrE and some speakers of AmE , the vowels in 'cot' and 'caught' are different phonemes. For other speakers of AmE, these two words are pronounced identically; there is only one vowel phoneme. There is also the problem that American and British writers sometimes use different symbols when they transcribe phonologically. .

    So, if you are asking a question about this vowel/these vowels, you will either have to use IPA phonetic (not phonemic) symbols, or provide links to sites where we can hear the sound(s) you are talking about.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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    Default Re: ɒ, the counterpart to ɔ in AmE?

    I know your deep consideration for cot-caught merger, which I have been worried about for a long time. I've learned speaking English from mostly the people from Utah who are cot-caught merged. And I have long mistaken the fact that most American are so, which is not according to the stastistics it's roughly 43%(merged) to 57%(unmerged).
    Even merged people pronounce the three vowels in "call, ball, hall" as same as non-merged people do. So these vowels are not "a" but the original /ɔ/, which is like a round bigger version of schwa. So based on this standard, would you please answer my question?

    "I think /ɒ/ as in not, hot, cot in BrE is the counterpart to /ɔ/ as in call, ball, hall in AmE"

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    Default Re: ɒ, the counterpart to ɔ in AmE?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    "I think /ɒ/ as in not, hot, cot in BrE is the counterpart to /ɔ/ as in call, ball, hall in AmE"
    I do not understand what you want to know. What do you mean by 'counterpart'?

    The RP /ɒ/ of BrE 'cot' has a very similar quality to that of the secondary Cardinal vowel [ɒ], i.e. an open, lip-rounded Cardinal Vowel [ɑ].
    It is not the same phoneme as the /ɑ:/ (between CV [a] and [ɑ], closer to the latter) of 'calm' in RP and General American, or the /ɔ:/ (somewhere between CV[ɔ] and CV [o] of BrE 'call'.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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    Default Re: ɒ, the counterpart to ɔ in AmE?

    By "counterpart" I meant the two look and sound similar to each other. [ɒ] and American /ɔ:/ seem to make round lips with the sound going inward like schwa. Maybe both are similar, but there's slightly little differences, which I need to watch through videos. Thanks!

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