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Thread: Gerund

  1. #1
    amigos is offline Junior Member
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    Default Gerund

    Hi,

    Is "I stopped loving her" grammatically correct? The reason why I am asking this is because "love" is an stative verb which can't be used in "ing" form. How about if I say it a bit differently like:

    "I ceased to love her."


    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos View Post
    Is "I stopped loving her" grammatically correct? The reason why I am asking this is because "love" is an stative verb which can't be used in "ing" form.
    Actually, some people believe that stative verbs cannot be used in the progressive form (which does not involve a gerund). That is over-simplified. The following sentence is fine:

    "I have been in Greece for two days and I am loving it here."

    When 'stop + verb+verb-form' indicates that the state or action ceases, that verb-form is always the gerund.

  3. #3
    amigos is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Gerund

    Thanks Moderator,

    What I understand is that the word "loving" in "I stopped loving her" is a gerund, not a progressive verb, right? Please could you elaborate on it.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Gerund

    I am living in Greece. - Progressive form (to be + present participle) to show a temporary state of affairs. Progressive forms are less common with stative verbs, but they are possible.
    I like living in Greece. - Gerund- gerunds can be used as subjects, after some verbs, after prepositions, etc. There's no problem with using a stative verb in this way.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos View Post
    Thanks Moderator
    I appreciate that you wish to be polite, but in this forum we simply address each other by our usernames.

    We UE moderators do some tidying up when trolls and time-wasters disrupt the peace of the forum. We are experienced teachers and/or writers, but our opinions are just that - opinions. So, I am '5jj', not 'Moderator'.

  6. #6
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Gerund

    I see that you live in Canada, amigos; and the two contributors who have corrected you (rightly, in Br English) are speakers of British English. When I was working in a group working on documentation standards for DEC (a very large company then, many of whose employees, and most of whose writers, came from the USA and Canada) I found that using the word 'gerund' generated more heat than light, as there was no trans-Atlantic agreement on its meaning. (I never reached a satisfactory understanding of the Am Eng sort of 'gerund'; still worse was the word 'gerundive', which I had previously met only in Latin grammar - where I hope it stays!) So proceed with caution.

    b

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