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    #1

    Question Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    Dear Sir/Madam:
    I'm translating a literature, and I'm not sure about a sentence.
    Can I say: Passions are running (down) from his brush. ?
    I'm not sure whether the word down here is OK, or this whole sentence is OK? or shall I totally regroup this sentence?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    Quote Originally Posted by contra6 View Post
    Dear Sir/Madam:
    I'm translating a some literature, and I'm not sure about a sentence.
    Can I say?: Passions are running (down) from his brush. ?
    I'm not sure whether the word down here is OK, or this whole sentence is OK? or shall I totally regroup this sentence?
    Thank you.
    Well...passions can't run from a brush. What are you trying to say here? By the way, we don't put a period and a question mark at the end of a sentence. The question mark should have been after "Can I say".

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    #3

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    Well I'm trying to say he is not only writing down simple words, but also with passions in it.
    In Chinese we usually express like this, but I'm not sure if this is OK in English:
    Passions are running down from his brush.
    And now I wrote another version:
    Passions are running at the tip of his brush.
    Is it OK in English?
    Thank you.

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    #4

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    Passions flow from the tip of his pen/brush? (Pen for writer, brush for artist)

    Neither of those sentences you suggested works IMO.

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    #5

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    Flow! thank you. That's what I'm looking for. I'm not sure whether running will be OK, and you answer do help. Flow seems much better than run.
    As for brush, the sentence is about calligraphy, and in Chinese calligraphy, they do write with brush.
    Thank you very much.

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    #6

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    That's what I thought, but a Western audience may associate a brush with painting rather than calligraphy. You could say passions flow from the calligrapher's brush.

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    #7

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    I just tried to ask about "run"/"flow", so I didn't put all my contexts here. I referred it as "writing brush" in my context, so I think it wouldn't cause misunderstanding.
    Thank you.

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    #8

    Re: Inquiry of the availability of a sentence.

    His brushstrokes convey great emotion.

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