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  1. #1
    Elena22 is offline Newbie
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    Default "above" and "scrap" and "scrab"

    I've amended my question. Sorry for ignoring good advices...

    I was memorising words and couldn't understand some meanings of them.
    I'll go with the word "above"...

    I know general meaning of "above",
    but I don't get it when you say "be above suspicion".
    What does it mean?

    And the question about "scrap" and "scrape" has been seperated.

    Thank you!
    Last edited by Elena22; 26-Apr-2013 at 05:52.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "above" and "scrap" and "scrab"

    Quote Originally Posted by Elena22 View Post
    so i have 2 questions basically...
    i was memorising words and couldn't understand some meanings of them.
    ill go with the word "above"...

    Q1. i know general meaning of "above",
    but i don't get it when you say "be above suspicion".
    what does it mean?

    Q2. as i said i was studying vocabulary and there was a word "abrasion".
    and in dictionary, it says "technical term to indicate injury where the skin has
    been scraped" or "scraping".
    i don't know what "scrape" means, so i looked it up in the dictionary again and
    it says "to rub" or "remove sth from a surface by moving objects such as knife".
    and then i happened to look for word "scrabble", and it seems that its meaning is the same
    as "scrap". my questions are,
    are words "scrape" and "scrabble" similar? if so, how similar are those?
    and is there a word called "scrab"?

    thank you!
    Please resubmit your post using correct capitalisation and punctuation. (to the best of your ability)

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "above" and "scrap" and "scrab"

    You appear to have forgotten (or ignored) every single thing I told you in a previous thread about the rules of written English. You will find that the volunteers here are much more helpful when we see that you are trying and that are actually following our advice.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "above" and "scrap" and "scrab"

    Additionally, Elena, please ask only one question per thread.

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