Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: fun-loving

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 1,038
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    fun-loving

    How to describe a person who can always bring laughing and joys to people, can make people smile their tears away, and can make people happy when they are sad? Take the following paragraph for example. Is it grammatically correct and natural? Please help me correct it. Thanks!

    Iím an outgoing girl, who likes to make friends. In most situations, I am fun-loving and easygoing. Sometimes I would act a little bit silly with a little bit clever to please everybody, so Iím everybodyís clown who always brings laughing and joys to the peers.

  1. shur2gal's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2013
    • Posts: 20
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: fun-loving

    Take out the comma after girl. Usually, a comma is only added when you pause during the sentence, and it usually is followed up by a transition (although not always). The sentence, "I'm an outgoing girl who likes to make friends," is a sentence that can stand by itself, without a comma. Sometimes needs a comma after it because it a transition (think of transitions like First, or, For Example,). Take out would too. (Sometimes, I act...). Would is past tense and you are describing yourself in the present. That sentence afterwards is weird too.... Mainly because I can't translate what you mean by "with a little bit of clever."

    Take out the comma after everybody and forgo the word "so" and make a new sentence with "I'm everybody's clown, who always brings laugh and joys to people everywhere."

    It's okay, but it needs lots of work. Try re-reading and re-wording. Good luck!

  2. Route21's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 938
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: fun-loving

    As an NES but not a teacher, the nearest expression that I can think of, off the cuff, is "the life and soul of the party".
    See:
    be the life and soul of the party - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Regards
    R21

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 1,038
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: fun-loving

    I reworded the paragraph as written.

    I’m an outgoing girl who likes to make friends. In most situations, I am fun-loving and easygoing. Sometimes, I act a little bit clownish to amuse people. I’m the life and soul of the party, who always brings laughs and joys to the people everywhere.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 20,227
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: fun-loving

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    I reworded the paragraph as written.

    I’m an outgoing girl who likes to make friends. In most situations, I am fun-loving and easygoing. Sometimes, I act a little bit clownish to amuse people. I’m the life and soul of the party, who always brings laughs and joys to the people everywhere.
    Omit the 's' and 'the'. Joy is uncountable in this context.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 16,032
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: fun-loving

    I'd change 'laughs' to 'laughter'.

    Rover

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: fun-loving

    I’m an outgoing girl, who likes to make friends. In most situations, I am fun-loving and easygoing. Sometimes I would act a little bit silly with a little bit clever to please everybody, so I’m everybody’s clown who always brings laughing and joys to the peers.
    Quote Originally Posted by shur2gal View Post
    Take out the comma after girl. Usually, a comma is only added when you pause during the sentence, and it usually is followed up by a transition (although not always). The sentence, "I'm an outgoing girl who likes to make friends," is a sentence that can stand by itself, without a comma.
    The comma is possible. Commas are used in non-defining clauses but not in defining clause. Thus we can have:

    1. I’m an outgoing girl, who likes to make friends.
    2.
    I’m an outgoing girl who likes to make friends.

    #1 has the idea of "I am am a friendly, sociable person (and I like to make friends)".
    #2 has the idea of "I am a friendly, sociable person who likes to make friends (as opposed to a friendly, sociable person who does not like to make friends)".

    A purist might regard both of these as pleonastic, but neither type is uncommon in informal speech or writing.
    Sometimes needs a comma
    A comma is possible, but I don't think it's essential. 76 of the first 100 COCA citations for sentence-initial 'sometimes' are not followed by a comma.
    Take out the comma after everybody and forgo the word "so" and make a new sentence with "I'm everybody's clown, who always brings ...
    That's possible, but not essential. With the changes suggested by Raymott and Rover, the sentence seems fine to me.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] Loving
    By Tina3 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2012, 14:42
  2. Complete fun or completely fun.
    By david11 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 31-May-2012, 08:34
  3. [Vocabulary] deride vs ridicule vs scoff at vs mock vs make fun of vs poke fun at
    By m5000 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Apr-2012, 02:25
  4. fun-loving?
    By ana laura in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2006, 23:03

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •