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Thread: "o'ercast"

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    #1

    "o'ercast"

    Dear Teachers

    In the following sentence, what does "o'ercast" mean? Please advise

    Now is the summer of our sweet content, made o'ercast winter by these Tudor clowns ... an I that am not shaped for black-faced war...

    Anthony the learner

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    #2

    Re: "o'ercast"

    Overcast. Cloudy.

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    #3

    Re: "o'ercast"

    Where does this come from. It sounds like a pastiche of Shakespeare:

    Now is the winter of our discontent
    Made glorious summer by this sun of York
    ...
    Richard III, Ii1-2

    The squashing of 'overcast' into only two syllables is a rather lame attempt at preserving the metre.

    As to the second one, I think it may be a more direct quote from Falstaff in one of the Henrys (with 'and' for 'an'). I leave tracing the exact line reference as an exercise for the reader.

    b

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    #4

    Re: "o'ercast"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I leave tracing the exact line reference as an exercise for the reader.
    The first episode of the BBC television comedy Blackadder in part parodies the Olivier film, visually (as in the crown motif), Peter Cook's performance as a benevolent Richard, and by mangling Shakespearean text ("Now is the summer of our sweet content made o'ercast winter by these Tudor clouds ..."
    Richard III (play) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #5

    Re: "o'ercast"

    "Made overcast by clouds" makes more sense than "made overcast by clowns."

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    #6

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    #7

    Re: "o'ercast"

    It sounds like clouds to me.

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    #8

    Re: "o'ercast"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Where does this come from. It sounds like a pastiche of Shakespeare:


    Richard III, Ii1-2

    The squashing of 'overcast' into only two syllables is a rather lame attempt at preserving the metre.

    As to the second one, I think it may be a more direct quote from Falstaff in one of the Henrys (with 'and' for 'an'). I leave tracing the exact line reference as an exercise for the reader.

    b


    Shakespeare is well known for 'squashing' words into 1/2 syllables throughout his work in order to preserve the metre. I wouldn't exactly class it as a 'rather lame attempt'. :D


    I had the misfortune of reading a great deal of Shakespeare in my first semester at university...It's daunting, but his word play is spectacular. :)
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

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    #9

    Re: "o'ercast"

    I was a bit unkind to Richard Curtis (the writer). When I appeared with him and Rowan on the Edinburgh Fringe his party piece was to do pastiches of Shakespeare. I admit it's prety good.

    And perhaps that clowns/clouds doubt is intentional - reflecting Shakespeare's Sun/son pun.

    b

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    #10

    Re: "o'ercast"

    Dear Haniball

    I don't understand what does " preserve the metre" mean. Could you elaborate? Many thanks

    Regards

    Anthony the leaner


    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    Shakespeare is well known for 'squashing' words into 1/2 syllables throughout his work in order to preserve the metre. I wouldn't exactly class it as a 'rather lame attempt'. :D


    I had the misfortune of reading a great deal of Shakespeare in my first semester at university...It's daunting, but his word play is spectacular. :)

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