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  1. #1
    Anewguest is offline Junior Member
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    Default Debt-free meaning

    Good evening (it's evening in my country :) ),


    I'm having trouble with the following sentence It is a debt-free international Visa card with no bank account required. The term 'debt-free' is self-explanatory, but not in this context, at least I don't get it.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Debt-free meaning

    I presume it means that it is not in fact a credit card, but rather one where you have to deposit money in advance and are then allowed to use the card anywhere Visa is accepted, like it was a credit card. You don't incur any debt because you are only allowed to spend as much money as you have given them in advance.

  3. #3
    Anewguest is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Debt-free meaning

    Thank you for a quick reply! I guess you're right.

  4. #4
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Debt-free meaning

    I guess this is just a sign of the lamentable, but real, change in the use of 'credit'. 'Debt-free credit card' is snappier than 'thing that looks like a credit card but isn't really one in the proper sense'

    b

    PS In defence of the new usage, it could be argued (and probably is by the people who provide the service), that if you hold a card that has $10 loaded onto it, it means that people selling you things can believe (credere - L 'to believe') you're good for that amount - so they provide goods to that value (bass*ed on that belief in your creditworthiness.

    PS *Normally I'd silently correct a typo; I've no idea where this one came from. But this one seems to be particularly (potentially) misleading. See new post.
    Last edited by BobK; 05-May-2013 at 14:06. Reason: Added PS

  5. #5
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Debt-free meaning

    In the UK, they're called "pre-loaded [Visa] cards".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  6. #6
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Debt-free meaning

    Apologia pro horror sua

    'Base' is a regular verb, with the simple past 'based'.

    However, there is also the word 'bass', pronounced /beɪs/. It is a noun and an adjective. I can't see any reason for making it a verb - though, conceivably, Mahler's Symphony of a Thousand Voices, might - in a creative and playful context - be described as 'many-bassed'* in the sense of 'scored for many bass voices'.

    So it seems to me conceivable that some student might see my typo and note it as an irregularity. If so, sorry

    b

    PS* Don't try this at home

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