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  1. #1
    negdcom is offline Newbie
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    Default Research paper on gene patents Part 6

    A. Conclusion
    No matter the outcome of this trial, it will have repercussions far beyond it. Medical research may hinge on the ability to freely conduct testing without the hindrance of getting permission and paying a fee to patent holders. It may seem like hyperbole but medical research as we know it today may grind to a fault while different organizations and groups try to find and patent every gene they can. For some the benefits of such an outcome outweigh the risks, due to the fact that we will know more about the human body and what causes certain diseases. That may be true but consider the following situation; a group of genes which serve as the linchpin of all cancers is discovered and patented by three or more laboratories. In order for any other labs to conduct research they would need to get permission and pay licensing fees to all involved. This would create a nightmare scenario wherein only the richest among us would be able to get tested. Thus you would create a master race not due to their strengths but due to the amount of money they have.














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    Futreal, P. A., et al (1998). U.S. Patent No. US5747282. Washington, DC: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

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    Association for Molecular Pathology, et al V. Myriad Genetics pg 56, 2010
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    John F. Merz, et al (2002). Diagnostic testing fails the test. Nature,415(6872), 577-579. Retrieved from Diagnostic testing fails the test

    Blumenthal D. (1997). Withholding research results in academic life science. evidence from a national survey of faculty. Journal of the American Medical Association, 277(15), 1224-1228. Retrieved from Withholding research results in academic life science. ... [JAMA. 1997] - PubMed - NCBI

    Tom Walsh, PHd. (2006). Spectrum of mutations in brca1, brca2, chek2, and tp53 in families at high risk of breast cancer . Journal of the American Medical Association, 295(12), 1379-1388. Retrieved from JAMA Network | JAMA | Spectrum of Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, and TP53 in Families at High Risk of Breast Cancer

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  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Research paper on gene patents Part 6

    Quote Originally Posted by negdcom View Post
    A. Conclusion
    No matter the outcome of this trial, it will have repercussions far beyond it. Medical research may hinge on the ability to freely conduct (it might be better to reword, to avoid noise from pedants; what matters is communication. and gratuitously waving red rags at bulls just to say 'split infinitives are OK' just isn't worth the bother. ) testing without the hindrance of getting permission and paying a fee to patent holders Sort out the numbers here. It may seem like hyperbole, but medical research as we know it today may grind to a fauhalt while different organizations and groups try to find and patent every gene they can. For some, the benefits of such an outcome outweigh the risks, due to the fact that because we will know more about the human body and what the causes of certain diseases (Repeat nouns, to maintain parallelism.). That may be true, but consider the following situation; a group of genes which serve as the linchpin of all cancers is discovered and patented by three or more (Are the numbers significvcant? laboratories. In order for any other labs to conduct research they would need to (See previous sentence and match tenses) get permission and pay licensing fees to all involved. This would create a nightmare scenario wherein only the richest among us would be able to get tested. Thus you would create a master race not due to their strengths but due to the amount of money they have.
    ...
    Is this American English? If not, 'No matter the outcome' doesn't work; 'No matter what the outcome is/may be...' or 'Regardless of the outcome...'.

    And the last sentence is a mess. Strength and wealth explain the characteristics of the master race. The race is not due to anything; its creation is. And the creation is 'due not to A but to B' - no need to repeat the 'due to'.

    I don't have time to go through the references.

    b

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