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    #1

    urge - why are adverbs added?

    Dear Teachers!

    In a dictionary there are few examples of how to use the verb "to urge"

    1. The old man was urging the cows along with a stick.
    2. What can we do to urge these lazy workers to greater production?


    In above sentences there are no adverbs related to the verb "to urge" but in the following examples there are. Why are they used, why exactly these ones but not other ones and what do they add to the meaning and are they used as a rule?

    3. The speaker tried to urge the crowd forward to show their opposition to the new law.
    4. I did have to urge the students along in the last few weeks before their examination.
    5. You must urge the children forward or we'll never get home.

    Thank you for your help!

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: urge - why are adverbs added?

    Quote Originally Posted by Annakrutitskaya View Post
    Dear Teachers!

    In a dictionary there are few examples of how to use the verb "to urge"

    1. The old man was urging the cows along with a stick.
    2. What can we do to urge these lazy workers to greater production?


    In above sentences there are no adverbs related to the verb "to urge" but in the following examples there are. Why are they used, why exactly these ones but not other ones and what do they add to the meaning and are they used as a rule?

    3. The speaker tried to urge the crowd forward to show their opposition to the new law.
    4. I did have to urge the students along in the last few weeks before their examination.
    5. You must urge the children forward or we'll never get home.

    Thank you for your help!
    You missed 'along' in sentence 1.
    Well, it's really quite simple. None of the adverbs are absolutely necessary, but they do tend to clarify the context.
    "Urge the cows along with a stick" implies that you're trying to get them moving.
    "Urge the cows with a stick" could mean you're beating them in an effort to get more milk out of them.
    Last edited by Raymott; 10-May-2013 at 15:36. Reason: typo

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