Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: spot where

  1. #1
    aysaa is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    608
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default spot where

    Hi,

    We can omit 'where' after some words such as 'place, anywhere, nowhere,...etc'. For example;

    I need a place I can stay for a month.

    My question is can we apply this to the noun 'spot' also?

    -Spanish researchers fnd the exact spot Julius Caesar was stabbed.

    Must I put 'where' after the word 'spot'?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    Sorry, but I need a place I can stay for a month is not common usage it Standard American English. It is awkward and confusing. The clause, I can stay for a month is a relative clause and it should be introduced with the relative pronoun, where.

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    "I need a place I can stay for a month" is absolutely fine in BrE. It would be equally fine with "where" after "place".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    aysaa is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    608
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    Thank you for the answer, emsr2d2.

    Could you please tell me can we apply it for the word 'spot'?

    -Spanish researchers fnd the exact spot Julius Caesar was stabbed.

    Is it OK or must I say 'Spanish researchers fnd the exact spot where Julius Caesar was stabbed' ?

    Thanks.

  5. #5
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    14,749
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    In most cases, pronouns introducing relative clauses (relative pronouns) can be omitted provided they are not the subjects of those relative clauses. Your first example is fine, in my opinion.

    In your second sentence the pronoun is optional also. One strange thing about the second example is the word "spot". It likely refers to the physical location of the attack, but it could also mean the place on his body where he was stabbed. +|

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    I thought the first sentence was fine too.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,091
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    Sorry, but I need a place I can stay for a month is not common usage it Standard American English. It is awkward and confusing. The clause, I can stay for a month is a relative clause and it should be introduced with the relative pronoun, where.
    With all respect, I strongly disagree. I even suspect that I had occasion to utter this line in my youth.

  8. #8
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,091
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: spot where

    In colloquial AmE, you can generally substitute spot for place and vice-versa. A parking place is the same a a parking spot. The spot where Cassius stabbed Julius is the same as the place where, except for the ambiguity noted by MikeNewYork.

    And to answer your original question, where is optional in both cases,

Similar Threads

  1. but no one could out you on the spot like
    By Tinkerbell in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-Sep-2010, 12:48
  2. [General] windfall/on the spot/in a spot/
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Mar-2010, 03:28
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Jul-2009, 20:56
  4. spot
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 30-Oct-2008, 00:36
  5. in the spot
    By impara in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 21-Mar-2008, 22:26

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •