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  1. #1
    Mumuqi is offline Newbie
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    Default Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its scener

    Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its scenery" or "famous historical sites"?


    In my country,I learned the phrase "a place of interest" when I was a middle school student.We were told that the phrase "a place of interest" should be translated as "a place famous for its scenery" or "famous historical sites".
    At that time,I paid no attention to it.However,I do feel confused right now.Firstly,I can not understand the function of "of".Is it the preposition implying the meaning of "belong to",just like the use of " 's"
    Meanwhile,the word interest also puzzled me.Is it related to the translated meaning "a place famous for its scenery" or "famous historical sites"? I cannot figure out that and find the relationship between the word interest and the translated meaning.


    Anyone who can help me is welcome.Thx

  2. #2
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its sce

    Quote Originally Posted by Mumuqi View Post
    Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its scenery" or "famous historical sites"?


    In my country,I learned the phrase "a place of interest" when I was a middle school student.We were told that the phrase "a place of interest" should be translated as "a place famous for its scenery" or "famous historical sites".
    At that time,I paid no attention to it.However,I do feel confused right now.Firstly,I can not understand the function of "of".Is it the preposition implying the meaning of "belong to",just like the use of " 's"
    Meanwhile,the word interest also puzzled me.Is it related to the translated meaning "a place famous for its scenery" or "famous historical sites"? I cannot figure out that and find the relationship between the word interest and the translated meaning.


    Anyone who can help me is welcome.Thx
    "A place of interest" might or might not be "famous". The term simply means that an indefinite number of persons are interested in the "place" for some reason such as scenery, history etc.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its sce

    I'm not sure where those 'translations' come from. They're wrong. The interest could arise from anything. (Maybe whoever suggested them wanted you to use more complex language.)

    b

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