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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default twice as likely to become overweight later in life than

    Doesn't "twice as likely to become overweight later in life than" have to be corrected to "twice more likely to become overweight later in life than"? Even if you write roughly, they can understand it, but wouldn't the precise one be better? I don't think if the last two below are acceptable.
    1. He is as likely to come as she is.(0)
    2. He is more likely to come than she is.(0)
    3. He is more likely to come as she is.(x)
    4. He is as likely to come than she is.(x)

    mo1-26)A new study suggests that children who often get serious ear infections are twice as likely to become overweight later in life than kids with healthier ears. To explain these findings, lead researcher Linda Bartoshuk from the University of Florida says repeated ear infections might permanently damage a nerve called the chorda tympani. This nerve starts at the front of the tongue,where it picks up taste sensations. From there, the nerve runs through the middle ear to the brain, where it delivers messages about what the tongue just tasted

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: twice as likely to become overweight later in life than

    "Twice as likely" makes perfect sense to me. If "regular" children have a 20% chance, the ones with the ear infections have a 40% chance.

  3. #3
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: twice as likely to become overweight later in life than

    so, "twice more likely ..." doesn't make sense here?

  4. #4
    probus's Avatar
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    Default Re: twice as likely to become overweight later in life than

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Doesn't "twice as likely to become overweight later in life than" have to be corrected to "twice more likely to become overweight later in life than"? Even if you write roughly, they can understand it, but wouldn't the precise one be better? I don't think if the last two below are acceptable.
    1. He is as likely to come as she is.(0)
    2. He is more likely to come than she is.(0)
    3. He is more likely to come as she is.(x)
    4. He is as likely to come than she is.(x)

    mo1-26)A new study suggests that children who often get serious ear infections are twice as likely to become overweight later in life than kids with healthier ears. To explain these findings, lead researcher Linda Bartoshuk from the University of Florida says repeated ear infections might permanently damage a nerve called the chorda tympani. This nerve starts at the front of the tongue,where it picks up taste sensations. From there, the nerve runs through the middle ear to the brain, where it delivers messages about what the tongue just tasted
    I understand your point. But customary phraseology limits the use of "twice more" to "two additional occasions or incidents." Therefore, in your passage, instead of twice more you'd have to say "two times more". This construction is common with three, four, and five times more etc., but two times more is rarer and less natural than twice as. In a way this reflects the converse of the fact that twice is common and thrice rather rare these days.

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