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Thread: stay 2 years

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    #1

    stay 2 years

    Hi,

    - Michale stayed (for) two years in Paris to study.

    - They lived in America (for) 10 years.

    Is, in these two senteces, the preposition 'for' optional? What if I omitted? I am aware that it is perfect with 'for', but I would like to know if it is OK or no without it.

    Thanks.

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stay 2 years

    In my opinion, your sentences are correct both with and without for.

    Native speakers often use spent for this kind of statement.

    Michale spent two years studying in Paris.

    They spent ten years in America.

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    #3

    Re: stay 2 years

    Stayed suggests to me that they were already in Paris and extended their time there by two years to study.

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    #4

    Re: stay 2 years

    <<<Stayed suggests to me that they were already in Paris and extended their time there by two years to study.>>>

    Stayed can also have the meaning of resided/lived. It gets a bit unclear.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: stay 2 years

    In my original response, I was influenced by my familiarity with Indian English, in which stay is the dominant verb for reside or live. When an Indian wants to know where you live, he will typically say "Where do you stay?"

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    #6

    Re: stay 2 years

    Yes, I had a conversation with someone from India about this. He refused to believe that asking someone where they were living could cause confusion.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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