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  1. #1
    sitifan is offline Senior Member
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    Default a long walk: a long time or a long distance? (need native speaker's help)

    Which does a long walk mean: walk for a long time or walk for a long distance?

  2. #2
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    probus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: a long walk: a long time or a long distance? (need native speaker's help)

    It can mean either or both. In AmE the question "how far is it from here" is very often answered with something like "it's a ten minute walk" or "a two hour drive." Thus time and distance become interchangeable.

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    Default Re: a long walk: a long time or a long distance? (need native speaker's help)

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Which does a long walk mean: walk for a long time or walk for a long distance?
    It's impossible to tell. He might have walked really slowly for four hours so it was a long walk as far as time is concerned but he might not have covered much ground. He might have walked really fast for an hour but covered six miles. That would be a long way in distance but not a particularly long walk in time.

    However, in BrE, if someone said to me "I'm going for a long walk" I would expect them to be away for at least two or three hours. If they came back half an hour later, I would say "I thought you said you were going for a long walk! Why are you back so soon?"
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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