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  1. #1
    unpakwon is offline Senior Member
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    Default to his credit ...

    The following in red is confusing. Would you please paraphrase it more easily?

    He called her into the library and began teaching her the letters of the alphabet. A few evenings later he put his hand over hers as it grasped the quill, and showed her how to form the letters. For a long time after that he taught her, and to his credit let it be recorded that he did a very good job. There is one specimen of her handwriting still in existence, and it shows that she wrote with a bold, self-confident flourish.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    "To his credit" means it is something that he is being commended for, recognized for.

  3. #3
    unpakwon is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "To his credit" means it is something that he is being commended for, recognized for.

    Thank you for the answer.

    Could I rewrite it as follows?

    "After that he taught her for a long time, and it (that he taught her) is something that he is recognized for."

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    Thank you for the answer.

    Could I rewrite it as follows?

    "After that he taught her for a long time, and it (that he taught her) is something that he is recognized for."
    No. He is not recognised for the fact that he taught her. He is recognised for the fact that he did a very good job of teaching her.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    The sentence doesn't make a lot of sense. I'm not sure why "he let it be recorded that he did a good job" is something that requires extraordinary credit. People usually like to have it be known that they do a good job.

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    The sentence doesn't make a lot of sense. I'm not sure why "he let it be recorded that he did a good job" is something that requires extraordinary credit. People usually like to have it be known that they do a good job.
    It doesn't say "he ​let it be recorded". It just says "[to his credit] let it be recorded ..."
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It doesn't say "he ​let it be recorded". It just says "[to his credit] let it be recorded ..."
    That's how I read it, but I see now that it was intended differently.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: to his credit ...

    For the benefit of the learners: "let it be recorded" = "We would like it to be recorded that".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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