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Thread: wriggle out of

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    #1

    wriggle out of

    - we had a date this afternoon but she wriggled out of it.

    a) is this verb commonly used or do you prefer "to avoid" or "to get out of"?
    b) could it be considered a synonym of "to stand someone up" or of "to chicken out"?
    c) can you suggest me other verbs to say the same concept?

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: wriggle out of

    Wriggle | Define Wriggle at Dictionary.com

    You wriggle out of a tight situation. Say you need to fit through a small passage. You may need to turn your body sideways and sort of inch along.

    Or imagine trying to catch an animal, like a cat. You think you have them held firmly, but they manage to twist and turn and escape your grasp.

    The implication is not that you were stood up, but that she got out of a situation which it seemed she had no way out of.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: wriggle out of

    I agree in the most part with SoothingDave but, in BrE, you can use it to mean "find some way out of a situation that you don't want to be in". Once you've arranged a date with someone, it's quite difficult to cancel without coming across as rude, especially if it's a first date. If I had agreed to go on a first date with someone but, the closer it came to the evening of the date, I started to think "What have I done? I really don't want to go on this date", I might start trying to think of some way to "wriggle out of it".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #4

    Re: wriggle out of

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I agree in the most part with SoothingDave but, in BrE, you can use it to mean "find some way out of a situation that you don't want to be in". Once you've arranged a date with someone, it's quite difficult to cancel without coming across as rude, especially if it's a first date. If I had agreed to go on a first date with someone but, the closer it came to the evening of the date, I started to think "What have I done? I really don't want to go on this date", I might start trying to think of some way to "wriggle out of it".
    Yes, the same can be used in AmE. It's not just something difficult to get out of, it can be something you want to avoid.

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