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Thread: Get on

  1. david11's Avatar
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    #1

    Get on

    Get on: 4. To acquire understanding or knowledge.

    One of the meanings of the phrase "get on" is the above.

    Can we use it like in the following?

    1) Get on physics. (to mean acquire knowledge in physics).

    Can it also be used to mean "come to this" in context like, come to Skype?

    The dictionary I refer never gives any meaning which would make "get on" mean "come to". However, I see people here using it in colloquial English.



  2. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Get on

    It's usually get on with. It often mean to make progress, and acquiring knowledge and understanding is a part of that. Here are some examples.

    My work left me no time for poetry, but I always thought that when I retired I'd be able to get on with it.

    Stop fooling with that silly photography and get on with your painting.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Get on

    'Get on' can't be used with "physics" like that. "Michael is really getting on in business" means to do well. I guess that comes under your definition.
    "Get on" doesn't mean "come to". What does "Come to Skype" mean to you?

  4. david11's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Get on

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    'Get on' can't be used with "physics" like that. "
    However, the definition says "acquire knowledge". Should we use any proposition to use it with the likes of physics or can't we use it at all?.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    '"Get on" doesn't mean "come to". What does "Come to Skype" mean to you?
    I meant "go online" on Skype. I used "come to" in the sense that I am asking someone to go online on Skype while I am too online there and then chat with me.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Get on

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    However, the definition says "acquire knowledge". Should we use any proposition to use it with the likes of physics or can't we use it at all?.



    I meant "go online" on Skype. I used "come to" in the sense that I am asking someone to go online on Skype while I am too online there and then chat with me.
    Which book says "Get on" means "to acquire knowledge"? I've never actually heard it used that way. "She's getting on well with her physics" would mean that she's learning it well; she's progressing well.
    "Get on Skype", "Come to Skype"; "Let's talk on Skype"; "Why don't we use Skype" could all be used to suggest to another person that they should join you on Skype. But "Get on" doesn't mean "Why don't we use" or "Let's talk on" unless you have the Skype context. In the same way, I would not say that "get on" means "acquire knowledge", since it's only in a very limited context, and with the right manipulation of the words that you can get it to mean that.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Get on

    Get on: 4. To acquire understanding or knowledge.


    Which dictionary did this come from?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

  8. david11's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Get on

    This is the one I was referring to!

  9. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Get on

    I don't think the example phrase they give justifies that definition.

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