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  1. #1
    Sepmre is offline Member
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    Post The arrangment of the words

    Hi,

    I would like to know how the two phrases below are different:

    high opportunity costs
    high costs opportunity


    Thanks

  2. #2
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The arrangment of the words

    Neither of them makes much sense to me. Have you any context?
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The arrangment of the words

    "Opportunity cost" is a concept from economics. So something with "high opportunity costs" is a possibility.

    "Costs opportunity" does not make sense.

  4. #4
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The arrangment of the words

    - it's a concept from economics, but in my view a redundant one. If someone in a sweet-shop can buy one gobstopper or two flying saucers for the same money (those were the days.... ), the opportunity cost of the two flying saucers is the gobstopper. If something has 'a high opportunity cost' then you have to go without a lot of other things in order to get it. As seemed to me to be the case with a lot of the economics I did at school, it just dressed up common sense with fancy words.

    b

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The arrangment of the words

    You must not be aware of this thing called "government," that likes to promise all benefit with no downside.

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