Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: out of the blue

  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 4,559
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    out of the blue

    Can "out of the blue" have the meaning of "out of the blue sea" as a metaphor? I have known it as "all of a sudden, without any premonition or notice".
    Bethany rolls
    along with the waves, [relaxing / relaxed] on her surfboard with her left arm [dangled / dangling] in the water.
    Then her life takes a serious turn . A shark appears, literally, out of the blue, and [bite / bites] her arm off.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,571
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: out of the blue

    Usually it's a metaphor. In this case, it came from the ocean, so it was also literal.
    (If it came without warning from the sky instead of the ocean, it would also be "out of the blue" in a literal sense.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 4,559
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: out of the blue

    I was suggesting the translation result of the translator, and I thought the Korean translator made a mistake. But as you said, so does it have both the literal meaning of "coming from the blue sea" and the mephaphoric sense of "all of a sudden"?
    Maybe I have to correct my stereotype notion of "out of the blue". This change came to me out of the blue.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,571
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: out of the blue

    It's BOTH in this instance. She never saw the shark coming. It came from the sea.

    If she were walking through the jungle and out of the blue a leopard took her arm instead of a shark, then it's just the metaphorical meaning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. There may be blue and better blue.
    By keannu in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-Aug-2012, 09:22
  2. What does blue mean
    By Over the top in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2011, 15:36
  3. [Idiom] go blue
    By akudash in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2009, 02:29
  4. out of the blue
    By WUKEN in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Jan-2009, 13:55
  5. Out of the blue
    By MW in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2006, 10:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •