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    #1

    She should be in the shower

    Dear all,
    Do you use "should" to refer to possibility?

    eg A: I wonder why Chris doesn't answer the phone.
    B: He should be in the shower. (I think he is probably in the shower.)

    Thank you.
    OP

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: She should be in the shower

    Quote Originally Posted by optimistic pessimist View Post
    Dear all,
    Do you use "should" to refer to possibility?

    eg A: I wonder why Chris doesn't answer the phone.
    B: He should be in the shower. (I think he is probably in the shower.)

    Thank you.
    OP
    No, that doesn't work.

    He must be in the shower.
    He might be in the shower.
    He's probably in the shower.
    He could be in the shower.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: She should be in the shower

    It can only work if you have already worked out a specific schedule in advance.

    He was going to leave at 7 am. It will take 3 hours to get to the client. It's 9 am. He should be on the road now.
    He needs to leave at 9 am. He said he wanted to sleep until at least 8:30. It's 8:40. He should be in the shower.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 16-Jun-2013 at 16:35.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: She should be in the shower

    In the context you used it, you would only be able to say something along the same lines as BarbD's post:

    - I wonder why Chris isn't answering his phone.
    - I don't know. He should be home by now.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #5

    Re: She should be in the shower

    Code:
    We use should/ought to for probability and shouldn't/ought not to for improbability.
    We believe the statement to be true because of our prior knowledge3, experience or present evidence:
    
    The plane should be landing about now.
    There shouldn't be problems with traffic at that time of the evening. 
    
    source: Longman Advanced Learner's Grammar, Mark Foley & Diane Hall
    This use is discussed under the heading of LOGICAL DEDUCTION AND PROBABILITY.

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    #6

    Re: She should be in the shower

    (Not a teacher)

    It makes sense in the appropriate context:
    1) Chris called to tell you he was going to take a shower and would be running late.
    2) Then your other friend calls you about 5 minutes later because he can't get Chris on the phone.
    3) That is when you might say, "Chris should be in the shower right now."

    You don't have visual confirmation that Chris is in the shower, but based on his call, you can reasonably assume that he is currently taking one.

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