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  1. #1
    sfyn2it's Avatar
    sfyn2it is offline Newbie
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    Default Its time I learn the difference between....

    Hello,
    Its time I learn when to use "like" and "as". I understand "like" is used for comparisons and "such as" is used to introduce examples but I am unsure which one to use in the following sentence and why.

    "My will, the wonderful infliction, is relentless and refuses to settle for less or submit to another who breaths, walks and speaks like/as I do."

    I chose like because I am comparing myself to others who walk, breath and speak as I do. But as sounds good also. I need your help.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Gillnetter is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Its time I learn the difference between....

    Quote Originally Posted by sfyn2it View Post
    Hello,
    Its time I learn when to use "like" and "as". I understand "like" is used for comparisons and "such as" is used to introduce examples but I am unsure which one to use in the following sentence and why.

    "My will, the wonderful infliction, is relentless and refuses to settle for less or submit to another who breaths, walks and speaks like/as I do."

    I chose like because I am comparing myself to others who walk, breath and speak as I do. But as sounds good also. I need your help.

    Thank you.
    The difference is quite hazy at best. The rule is that "like" is used when no verb follows (He acted like a dog) and to use "as" when there is a verb following (He acted as though he was a dog). In common practice one will hear - "It's like I was driving my own car". According to the rule, the sentence should be, "It's as though I was driving my own car". Generally, use "like" when it is a simple sentence and "as" when the sentence is more complex.

  3. #3
    sfyn2it's Avatar
    sfyn2it is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Its time I learn the difference between....

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    The difference is quite hazy at best. The rule is that "like" is used when no verb follows (He acted like a dog) and to use "as" when there is a verb following (He acted as though he was a dog). In common practice one will hear - "It's like I was driving my own car". According to the rule, the sentence should be, "It's as though I was driving my own car". Generally, use "like" when it is a simple sentence and "as" when the sentence is more complex.
    I guess you said it best: it's a bit hazy.

    Let me wrap my head around your explanation. Using the sentence in the original post and applying your definition, the correct word should then be "as" since "do" follows and "do" is a verb. Is that correct?

  4. #4
    Gillnetter is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Its time I learn the difference between....

    Quote Originally Posted by sfyn2it View Post
    I guess you said it best: it's a bit hazy.

    Let me wrap my head around your explanation. Using the sentence in the original post and applying your definition, the correct word should then be "as" since "do" follows and "do" is a verb. Is that correct?
    "My will, the wonderful infliction, is relentless and refuses to settle for less or submit to another who breaths, walks and speaks like/as I do."

    I would use "as", meaning "in the manner of" - "...walks and speaks in the same manner that I walk and speak". If there is a subject and a verb, use "as". If there is a noun or a noun phrase, use "like".

    Bob is like me.
    Bob smiles as I do.

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