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  1. #1
    mektok is offline Junior Member
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    Default A 0.1 ml of both? can we use "a"?

    Hi again,
    Kindly correct me on this sentence:
    A 0.1 ml of broth of the test organisms was introduced into 1 ml of 1.0% of the soap solution.
    I thought we could omit the word "A". or can I re-phrase like "0.1 ml of tested organisms in broth was introduced into 1 ml of 1.0% of the soap solution"

    Kind regards,
    Last edited by mektok; 18-Jun-2013 at 08:56. Reason: spelling error for the subject

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: A 0.1 ml of both? can we use "a"?

    Who wrote the original sentence? He/she had probably read that it's bad form to begin a sentence with a numeral.

    You can omit 'A', but I can't comment on the technical content of the sentence.

    Rover

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: A 0.1 ml of both? can we use "a"?

    If you want to use "A", you'd have to say "A tenth of centilitre of ..." or "A hundredth of a litre of ...". As it stands, the article is incorrect. In general, the rule about not starting a sentence with a numeral stands, but in this case it would be fine. It would be read as "Zero point one millilitres of broth ...". I wouldn't necessarily expect the rules of written English to be too important in what appears to be some kind of scientific equation or calculation.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: A 0.1 ml of both? can we use "a"?

    Quote Originally Posted by mektok View Post
    Hi again,
    Kindly correct me on this sentence:
    A 0.1 ml of broth of the test organisms was introduced into 1 ml of 1.0% of the soap solution.
    I thought we could omit the word "A". or can I re-phrase like "0.1 ml of tested organisms in broth was introduced into 1 ml of 1.0% of the soap solution"

    Kind regards,
    "The test organisms in 0.1 ml of broth were introduced into 1 ml of 1.0% of the soap solution."
    "We introduced 0.1 ml of broth containing the test organisms into 1 ml ..." (Science papers in some fields are reducing the use of the passive voice as the only choice.)
    "Test organisms" are the organisms that you're testing. It doesn't mean "tested organisms" which, by definition, have been tested already.
    I imagine you'd also need to say what the concentration of test organisms was in the 0.1 ml of broth.

  5. #5
    mektok is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: A 0.1 ml of both? can we use "a"?

    I totally agree with you Raymott, the author should mention the concentration of the those bugs..

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