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  1. #1
    D-F1N is offline Newbie
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    Exclamation Using homonymy in English proverbs and sayings. HELP!!!

    I need some help in writing my diploma work.The subject is "The translation methods of proverbs and sayings based on homonymy".
    So, it would be great, if You give me some examples of proverbs and sayings, where homonyms are used.
    I've seen a lot of sites and couldn't find such proverbs.
    Please, help me, i don't have much time to finish my work!

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Using homonymy in English proverbs and sayings. HELP!!!

    We don't do homework.

  3. #3
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: Using homonymy in English proverbs and sayings. HELP!!!

    I have a feeling the OP just wants a list; s/he will presumably do the thinking him/herself . (Call me na´ve. but maybe the word 'diploma' suggests a student who knows the value of study [and the pointlesness of pretending work is yours when it isn't].)

    If so an interesting one is the proverbial Cast ne'er a clout till May be out. (Sometimes people turn the 'ne'er' into the easier 'not'; clout is related to the word 'clothing'.)

    The crucial word is May. There are 3 variables:

    • It could refer to the blossoms of the hawthorn (also known as 'May') - 'be out' = having come out in blossom
    • It could refer to the month of May - 'be out' ='be over'
    • It could refer to the month of May in the Julian calendar [=2nd week of June] - 'be out' ='be over'


    But whichever it is, it means 'Don't go dressed for summer until it really is summer. '

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 21-Jun-2013 at 18:00. Reason: tupo fix

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