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    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #1

    Smile Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    Does anyone know the amount of time represented by the word "bit". For example... I'll be back in a bit. It is an extra credit question from my son's math teacher. Jiffy was the other word and that is 10 milliseconds. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    -L

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    #2

    Re: Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    I don't know of any scientific definition for 'bit'. There are two for jiffy, though:
    http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictJ.html#jiffy
    The same site doesn't give anything for bit.

  1. rewboss's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    The only scientific use for "bit" that I know is a single binary digit. A bit can be set to 0 or 1; and there are 8 bits in one byte.

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    #4

    Re: Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    Me too; and I can't see how that can be used as a measure of time.

  2. SunnyDay's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    I didn't even know that "jiffy" had a set time frame. O_o

    As for bit, there's no time frame for that, either. I usually think of it as one to two hours:

    "I'm going shopping; I'll be back in a bit."
    "I'm going to go visit a friend; I'll be back in a bit."
    "I've got to go eat; I'll call you back in a bit."


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    #6

    Re: Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    I know that scientists often take common words and use them for obscure meanings, as in the Jiffy example quoted.

    I was intrigued by your question and just spent some time searching to see if I could find a specific technical use for 'bit', but with no success.

    Please post again and tell us what your son's teacher says is the answer!

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    #7

    Re: Using "Bit" as an amount of time

    Yes- I'd love to know as well.

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