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  1. #1
    Ryepower92 is offline Newbie
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    Default The wind swept over

    Hi!:)

    I've read a book recently and I came across the following sentence which totally confused me about what I had learnt of the past perfect before.

    The sentence is the following:

    The wind swept over me before i had moved a yard

    I thought that the past perfect was used for expressing acts which happens before and not after a certain act in the past.

    And in this case the wind had come before the hero could move a yard !

    It's an old story from the 1800's all I can think of is that the past perfect was used in a different way then or something like that.

    Thanks for answering me in advance!:)

  2. #2
    charliedeut's Avatar
    charliedeut is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The wind swept over

    IMO, it just carries the sense that the hero started to move and, suddenly, the wind swept over him. So first would come the movement, then the wind, although both actions are nearly simultaneous.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: The wind swept over

    The age of the text is immaterial. We use the same construction today.

    'I stepped down from the helicopter and the downdraught blew my hat off before I had taken two steps.'

    Rover

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