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  1. #1
    David Czech is offline Newbie
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    Default the adjective "duteous"

    Hello,

    I would like to ask native speakers a question about the adjective "duteous", which I found in Shakespeare´s "Othello". In The Free Dictionary, which is a compilation of several high-quality dictionaries, it is evaluated as "archaic and formal" in one entry (The Collins Dictionary), and not stylistically classified in other entries. According to Google search engine, the adjective "dutiful" occurs like ten times more often (I didn´t use specialized language copora).

    My point is: isn´t it too formal, old-fashioned or perhaps even ridiculous (esp when used by a learner of English as a foreign language, whose speaking or writing skills are generally far from perfect)? Or is it still usable as a standard expression at least in written English?

    Thanks

    David

  2. #2
    Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    Chicken Sandwich is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: the adjective "duteous"

    I've never seen this word in modern writing.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: the adjective "duteous"

    Quote Originally Posted by David Czech View Post
    Hello,

    I would like to ask native speakers a question about the adjective "duteous", which I found in Shakespeare´s "Othello". In The Free Dictionary, which is a compilation of several high-quality dictionaries, it is evaluated as "archaic and formal" in one entry (The Collins Dictionary), and not stylistically classified in other entries. According to Google search engine, the adjective "dutiful" occurs like ten times more often (I didn´t use specialized language copora).

    My point is: isn´t it too formal, old-fashioned or perhaps even ridiculous (esp when used by a learner of English as a foreign language, whose speaking or writing skills are generally far from perfect)? Or is it still usable as a standard expression at least in written English?

    Thanks

    David
    I doubt that I have ever used that word. It would not be on a list of words I would want English learners to know.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: the adjective "duteous"

    I've never seen it used and never used it myself. If I were you, I'd store it away in a little part if your brain reserved for interesting words you've seen, checked out but will never use. It would, however, be a useful word for Scrabble!
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the adjective "duteous"

    I have never seen it outside Shakespeare, and didn't recognize it when I read it here, for a few moments. It's a real archaism.

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