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  1. #1
    David Czech is offline Newbie
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    Default "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Hello,

    I would like to ask a question about the word „grip“ / „grippe“ / „la grippe“ (= influenza).

    According to The Collins English Dictionary (2003; all my references to all dictionaries are actually taken from The Free Dictionary – based on Collins etc.), the word is „a former name“ for influenza. In The Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary (2010) one can find a stylistic classification „older use“. The Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health (2003) calls it just a „popular term for influenza“ (not an old-fashioned one).

    I came across the word in one short story by I. B. Singer (and I, therefore, guessed at first it would be a loanword from German – die Grippe – via Yiddish, of which German is a substantial component; the word has been, however, taken over from Old French, as I come to know now in the dictionaries).

    And I would like to ask native speakers / English teachers a question: is the word still widely in use? Would you use it? Or is it better to avoid it?

    Thanks

    David

  2. #2
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    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Quote Originally Posted by David Czech View Post
    Hello,

    I would like to ask a question about the word „grip“ / „grippe“ / „la grippe“ (= influenza).

    According to The Collins English Dictionary (2003; all my references to all dictionaries are actually taken from The Free Dictionary – based on Collins etc.), the word is „a former name“ for influenza. In The Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary (2010) one can find a stylistic classification „older use“. The Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health (2003) calls it just a „popular term for influenza“ (not an old-fashioned one).

    I came across the word in one short story by I. B. Singer (and I, therefore, guessed at first it would be a loanword from German – die Grippe – via Yiddish, of which German is a substantial component; the word has been, however, taken over from Old French, as I come to know now in the dictionaries).

    And I would like to ask native speakers / English teachers a question: is the word still widely in use? Would you use it? Or is it better to avoid it?

    Thanks

    David
    The last time I heard this word was in a song from Guys and Dolls. I would avoid it in modern English.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    I've heard it in French, but never in English. I must have missed Guys and Dolls.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I must have missed Guys and Dolls.
    That's a situation I wouldn't recommend rectifying.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    I've never heard it in English either.

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That's a situation I wouldn't recommend rectifying.
    It was a very good musical.

  7. #7
    riquecohen's Avatar
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I've never heard it in English either.
    My father, New York-born in 1898, used it all the time. I've never heard anyone else use the word in English.

  8. #8
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I've never heard it in English either.
    My father, New York-born in 1898, used it all the time. I've never heard anyone else use the word in English.
    I have seen it in written English from the 1920s and before, spelled grippe. It was a synonym for cold or flu. And I think my grandmother used it too. But I consider it to have fallen out of use and would avoid it.

  9. #9
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    I have seen it in written English from the 1920s and before, spelled grippe. It was a synonym for cold or flu. And I think my grandmother used it too. But I consider it to have fallen out of use and would avoid it.
    Mandy Moore singing Adelaide's Lament from Guys and Dolls.

    See here: Mandy Moore - Adelaides Lament - YouTube

  10. #10
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "grip" / "grippe"/ "la grippe"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I've heard it in French, but never in English. I must have missed Guys and Dolls.
    'A person can develop a cold' - Adelaide.

    b

    PS Posted before I saw #-1. I'm leaving it because of riquecohen's point: she says /pɔɪsən/. It's set in New York.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 08-Jul-2013 at 10:34. Reason: Added PS

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