Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: as/as were

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 131
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    as/as were

    What is the difference between these 2 sentences:

    Today's children are pressurized as were yesterday's adults.

    Today's children are pressurized as yesterday's adults.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,990
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: as/as were

    Quote Originally Posted by kachibi View Post
    What is the difference between these 2 sentences?

    Today's children are pressurized as were yesterday's adults.

    Today's children are pressurized as yesterday's adults.
    The first is acceptable. The second is not. The first is not very natural though.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 16,147
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: as/as were

    Quote Originally Posted by kachibi View Post
    What is the difference between these 2 sentences:

    Today's children are pressurized as were yesterday's adults.

    Today's children are pressurized as yesterday's adults.
    The word "pressurized" is usually used with gases in tanks/canisters.

    If I understand your intended meaning, you might try: Today's children are under as much pressure as were yesterday's adults.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 131
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: as/as were

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The first is acceptable. The second is not. The first is not very natural though.
    Why the second one is not correct? I was once taught from a grammar forum that an "as" can already replace the whole combination parallel to the first part of the sentence. That the full version should be: today's children are pressurized as were yesterday's adults. But the short version with only an "as" also serves to give the same meaning.

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 1,952
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: as/as were

    Hello, kachibi.

    "Today's children are as pressurized as yesterday's adults."
    and
    "Today's children are pressurized like yesterday's adults." are grammatical, but, as ems and Mike suggest, they sound weird:

    Definition of pressurized | Collins English Dictionary

    I hope my reply will shed some light on your query.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 131
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: as/as were

    OK, actually my focus is whether the use of "as", "as xxxx as" and "as xxx as be sth" are interchangeable. Perhaps we may put aside the context of my given example first:
    -Mary is as pretty as Betty.
    -Mary is pretty as Betty.
    -Mary is as pretty as is Betty.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,990
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: as/as were

    Quote Originally Posted by kachibi View Post
    OK, actually my focus is whether the use of "as", "as xxxx as" and "as xxx as be sth" are interchangeable. Perhaps we may put aside the context of my given example first:
    -Mary is as pretty as Betty.
    -Mary is pretty as Betty.
    -Mary is as pretty as is Betty.
    Mary is as pretty as Betty. (They are equal in prettiness.)
    Mary is pretty, as is Betty. (Mary is pretty and Betty is also pretty. They may not be equal.)
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jan 2012
    • Posts: 131
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: as/as were

    So under no circumstance can I use "sb/sth is xxx as sb/sth else" such structure?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,990
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: as/as were

    Quote Originally Posted by kachibi View Post
    So under no circumstance can I use "sb/sth is xxx as sb/sth else" such structure?
    We hate the words "never" and "under no circumstances" but I cannot think of a single way in which that construction would be correct English. There is an idiom we use which is "She/He/It is as nice as pie" which frequently gets shortened to "She is/She's nice as pie" but that is not the correct full construction.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •