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Thread: All that!

  1. #1
    Carolina1983 is offline Junior Member
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    Default All that!

    How is /l/ pronounced before th? Does the tip of the tongue come out for the /l/ in anticipation of the th sound? "All that", for instance.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    EnglishFix is offline Member
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    Default Re: All that!

    It think the tongue retains its normal position for the /l/ and the tip quickly comes out and strikes the back of the teeth as soon as the th sound is started.

  3. #3
    N Senbei is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: All that!

    Hello, Carolina1983.

    As a non-native learner, I can’t say for sure, but I think /l/ in “All that” can be assimilated to // and realized as a dental lateral approximant.
    This is a quotation from “An Introduction to English Phonetics” by Richard Ogden:

    2.5.3 Dental
    Dental sounds involve an articulation made against the back of the upper teeth.
    [θ ] in English (as in the initial sounds of ‘think’ and ‘then’) are often dental; they can also be interdental, that is, produced with the tongue
    between (‘inter’ in Latin) the teeth, especially in North America.

    Dental forms of [l] and [n] are used in words like ‘health’ and ‘tenth’, where they are followed by a dental; and dental forms of [t] and [d] are
    regularly used in many varieties of English (e.g. some forms of Irish or
    New York English, and in Nigeria) as forms of [θ ].

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