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    #1

    get out and get over

    Good evening to everybody.
    I have opened this new thread because I cannot understand these two verbs "get out" and "get over" with the particular meaning I'm going to use in the sentences below. I've been studying in details the use of the verb "get" with prepositions and I've come across in these two in sentences like,
    A) Bill got over to Peoria
    B) Bill got out to Peoria.
    Now, the author of the book I've been reading says "Bill arrived in Peoria from the east or west" for the first, and "Bill arrived in Peoria from east or from a larget city". Now, I cannot get the meaning of "out" and "over" and why English people use them here in this case. Is there any particular logic in this use? How could you help me understand their uses. May it be an idiomatic use?

    In sentences like "Bill got to Peoria", it's simple because we have the verb "get to" which in this case means "to arrive"; in "Bill got back to Peoria", "Bill got up to Peoria", "Bill got down to Peoria", the sense is quite clear because I can catch the movement Bill did, but in the two with "out" and "over" which movement would he do?

    I hope you can help me with these and maybe give me more examples about this, according to me, weird use of "get out" and "get over".

    Thank you very much in advance.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: get out and get over

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Good evening to everybody.
    I have opened this new thread because I cannot understand these two verbs "get out" and "get over" with the particular meaning I'm going to use in the sentences below. I've been studying in details the use of the verb "get" with prepositions and I've come across in these two in sentences like,
    A) Bill got over to Peoria
    B) Bill got out to Peoria.
    Now, the author of the book I've been reading says "Bill arrived in Peoria from the east or west" for the first, and "Bill arrived in Peoria from east or from a larget city". Now, I cannot get the meaning of "out" and "over" and why English people use them here in this case. Is there any particular logic in this use? How could you help me understand their uses. May it be an idiomatic use?

    In sentences like "Bill got to Peoria", it's simple because we have the verb "get to" which in this case means "to arrive"; in "Bill got back to Peoria", "Bill got up to Peoria", "Bill got down to Peoria", the sense is quite clear because I can catch the movement Bill did, but in the two with "out" and "over" which movement would he do?

    I hope you can help me with these and maybe give me more examples about this, according to me, weird use of "get out" and "get over".

    Thank you very much in advance.
    I don't find either of them to be natural English.

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    #3

    Re: get out and get over

    Those two examples are not standard English. They are idiomatic...as you wrote.
    They sound like expressions used by rural people such as my grandparents.

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    #4

    Re: get out and get over

    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishFix View Post
    Those two examples are not standard English. They are idiomatic...as you wrote.
    They sound like expressions used by rural people such as my grandparents.
    You mean they sound like being pronounced by people without an education? How would you correct them in a better English?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: get out and get over

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    How would you correct them in a better English?
    That depends on exactly what meaning you are trying to convey.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: get out and get over

    But do you think they can be considered American English phrasal verbs or are they used in British English too?
    1) According to to definition about their use, could I say for instance:
    A) Sandra got over to San Francisco yesterday (Sandra is from New York city).
    B) Sandra got out to Naples yesterday ( Sandra is from Rome).
    2) What about the other verbs with "get" I wrote in the original thread?

    I thank you all for the help you're giving me to understand them.

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    #7

    Re: get out and get over

    Any opinion about what I last posted?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: get out and get over

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    But do you think they can be considered American English phrasal verbs or are they used in British English too?
    1) According to to definition about their use, could I say for instance:
    A) Sandra got over to San Francisco yesterday (Sandra is from New York city).
    B) Sandra got out to Naples yesterday ( Sandra is from Rome).
    2) What about the other verbs with "get" I wrote in the original thread?

    I thank you all for the help you're giving me to understand them.
    These phrases are not often used for long distances (such as New York to California). Normally, "get out to" is used for a location away from a central location. For example, a person living in a city might ask "Do you ever get out to the suburbs?" "Get over to" is often used for a short distance, usually in a direction that is east or west. In New York City, one might ask "Do you ever get over to New Jersey?" When the destination is north or south, it is common to say "get up to" and "get down to", respectively.

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    #9

    Re: get out and get over

    Are they used both in American English and in British English?

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: get out and get over

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Are they used both in American English and in British English?
    I can only say "yes" for AmE.

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