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Thread: Whirligig

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    #1

    Whirligig

    Hello,

    The attached picture is a whirligig, isn't it?
    Actually we want to mix this word (whirligig) with another word (thread) to make a new combination. It's a kind of whirligig in which thread is used. Is it correct to say "thread whirligig"?
    Thanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Whirligig.jpg  

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    #2

    Re: Whirligig

    'Whirligig' appears to be the AmE word for what British children call windmills.

    Click here to see pictures of windmills, though you have to scroll a long way down that page to find this — a similar
    thing to the whirligig.

    However, I don't understand what you mean by a 'thread whirligig'.

    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 14-Jul-2013 at 07:53.

  1. Nicklexoxo's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Whirligig

    Sorry, but can I call it a "whirligig" ?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6855927jl8.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	42.9 KB 
ID:	1569
    If I have made any mistakes, please tell me about them. I need to improve my English anyway and I hope you'll help me.

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    #4

    Re: Whirligig

    I would call that a "spinning top" or just a "top".
    Google "spinning top image".

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    #5

    Re: Whirligig

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    'Whirligig' appears to be the AmE word for what British children call windmills.

    Click here to see pictures of windmills, though you have to scroll a long way down that page to find this — a similar
    thing to the whirligig.

    However, I don't understand what you mean by a 'thread whirligig'.

    Rover
    In AmE, we also call them pinwheels.

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    #6

    Re: Whirligig

    Yes, I'd call it a pinwheel.

    I thought a "whirligig" was sort of like a "whatchamacallit"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: Whirligig

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicklexoxo View Post
    Sorry, but There's nothing to be sorry about.

    Can I call this a "whirligig" ?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6855927jl8.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	42.9 KB 
ID:	1569
    Like JMurray, I and everybody I know calls that a top.

    Surprisingly, however, most of the dictionaries here also call it a whirligig.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Whirligig

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Like JMurray, I and everybody I know calls that a top.

    Surprisingly, however, most of the dictionaries here also call it a whirligig.
    Interesting. I have never heard that called anything but a top.

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Whirligig

    Canadian kids mainly call those windmills too, but it's an incorrect term, they only look somewhat like windmills. In fact it's a pinwheel.

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    #10

    Re: Whirligig

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    'Whirligig' appears to be the AmE word for what British children call windmills.

    Click here to see pictures of windmills, though you have to scroll a long way down that page to find this — a similar
    thing to the whirligig.

    However, I don't understand what you mean by a 'thread whirligig'.

    Rover
    Thanks everyone for your comments.
    So I decided to call it "pinwheel". The idea of "Thread Pinwheel" comes from a kind of pinwheel in which thread is used. It's a pinwheel to which pieces of thread are attached. The question "Does it work?" doesn't matter, I'm just wondering if this combination makes sense and if the sentences / definitions above fit this combination "Thread Pinwheel".
    Thanks.

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