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  1. #1
    bob12603 is offline Newbie
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    Default "come" vs. "come over" vs. "come on over"

    I've used all three all of my life but I am wondering how they differ.

    It seems to me that "come (on) over" only is used when the distance is not great and the movement will be easy and the visit will be casual. Although I am not so sure. I can almost hear myself saying to someone from Europe "come on over here (to the US) next summer and I will show you around."

    I am more sure that "come (on) over" only works for horizontal movement. If you live above me or below me in an apartment building I would not say "come (on) over to my apartment", I'd say "come up/down to my apartment."

    What do you think?

    Thanks, Bob

  2. #2
    EnglishFix is offline Member
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    Default Re: "come" vs. "come over" vs. "come on over"

    Bob,
    I agree that "come on over" is for horizontal movement while "come on down/up" is for more vertical movements.

  3. #3
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    probus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "come" vs. "come over" vs. "come on over"

    A couple of other connotations that I suspect may exist:

    1. The bare come is used when the date has been agreed but the details are uncertain. We know you are coming for the weekend so we say "Come Friday evening" or "Come Saturday morning."

    2. "Come on over" may be a regionalism, although I cannot specify the region in which it is used. Where I live we always say "come over".

  4. #4
    bob12603 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: "come" vs. "come over" vs. "come on over"

    Wasn't there a famous game show host who would say "come on down" when inviting audience members to join him on the stage?


    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    A couple of other connotations that I suspect may exist:

    1. The bare come is used when the date has been agreed but the details are uncertain. We know you are coming for the weekend so we say "Come Friday evening" or "Come Saturday morning."

    2. "Come on over" may be a regionalism, although I cannot specify the region in which it is used. Where I live we always say "come over".

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