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    #1

    IN / ON / AT the back

    Hi,


    I got confused since i have seen people use all three of them in the following context:

    "Can you close the zip AT the back of my dress"
    "Can you close the zip IN the back of my dress"
    "Can you close the zip ON the back of my dress"

    Which one is correct? and why? I am confused which one is correct.

    Thanks

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    Quote Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
    Hi,


    I got confused since i have seen people use all three of them in the following context:

    "Can you close the zip AT the back of my dress"
    "Can you close the zip IN the back of my dress"
    "Can you close the zip ON the back of my dress"

    Which one is correct? and why? I am confused which one is correct.

    Thanks
    I have never heard any of them. At least in AmE, we don't close zippers, we zip or unzip them.

    Can you zip up my dress?

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    #3

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    Thanks MikeNewYork.

    If i rephrased it:

    AT the back of the dress, there's a zip.
    ON the back of the dress, there's a zip.
    IN the back of the dress, there's a zip.

    What are the difference between them?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    Perhaps "zip" is British, but in American English, it's zipper. "Zip" is the verb.

    There's a zipper in the back of the dress.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Perhaps "zip" is British,
    Yes, it is.

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    #6

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    We say, in BrE, "do up" and "undo" a zip.

    Can you do up the zip at the back of my dress please?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #7

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    not a teacher

    In Aust/NZ I never hear "zipper", "zip" serves as noun and verb.
    As per emsr2d2's: "Can you do up the zip at the back of my dress please?"
    Or, and very commonly: "Can you zip me up at the back please?"
    It is usually "zip up" but I do hear "Can you zip me?".
    Last edited by JMurray; 17-Jul-2013 at 12:46.

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    #8

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    would it be wrong to use 'on' since the zipper is on the back?


    There is a zipper on the back of my dress.

    thanks again

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    #9

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    I think I would use "on."

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    #10

    Re: IN / ON / AT the back

    The dress zips up the back.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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