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    #1

    I don't want it to be for a quickie

    In the sitcom Desperate housewives,

    Some one says "If I am gonna break a commandment, I don't want it to be for a quickie."

    I don't understand. why "to be" is there. I mean, I think "I don't want it for a quickie or I don't want it quickly" seems more natural.

    Help please.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    I don't think you understand the meaning of 'a quickie' as used in Desperate Housewives.

    Here's what it means:

    used in a humorous way for talking about sex that people have in a hurry

    (Macmillan)

    Does that help?

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    #3

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    Thanks, Rover, but still I am confused... If I just say "I don't want it for a quickie", would it be wrong?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    Quote Originally Posted by layla0302 View Post
    Thanks, Rover, but still I am confused... If I just say "I don't want it for a quickie", would it be wrong?
    Yes, it would be wrong. You could say "If I'm going to break a commandment, I don't want to do it for a quickie". Here "I don't want to do it" means "I don't want to break a commandment" and "for a quickie" means "simply in order to have a quick sexual encounter with someone".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #5

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    not a teacher

    Rover's link doesn't take me to the definition of "quickie".
    In case anyone else has this problem: quickie - definition of quickie by Macmillan Dictionary

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    "If I am gonna break a commandment, I don't want it to be for a quickie."
    "I don't want breaking a commandment to be for a quickie."

    Compare:
    "I don't want my efforts to be for nothing."
    "If I get married, I want it to be for love, not for money."

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    #7

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    Thanks Raymond, so do you mean that saying "I don't want it for a quickie" is wrong although in grammatically purpose it seems ok?

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I don't want it to be for a quickie

    Quote Originally Posted by layla0302 View Post
    Thanks Raymond, so do you mean that saying "I don't want it for a quickie" is wrong although in grammatically purpose it seems ok?
    Yes, it's wrong.
    "I don't want the reason for breaking a commandment to be a quickie."
    "I don't want the reason for it to be a quickie."
    "I don't want it to be for a quickie."

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