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  1. #11
    abrilsp Guest

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    Hi :)

    The preposition 'at' refers to a point in space, whereas the preposition 'in' refers to inside
    What about in the sentence "people stood in their doors" or "...... at their doors" or both?
    Many thanks

    abrilsp

  2. #12
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    So, is it correct to use the preposition "at" in the sentence?

    I saw a robbery which took place/take place at Henrys Jewellery.
    You use which with took but not with take:

    • I saw a robbery which took place at Henrys Jewellery.
      I saw a robbery take place at Henrys Jewellery.


    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    What about the preposition used in the following sentence. Is it correct? Thanks again for helping! ^o^

    Last Saturday, there were many people shopping in the Henrys Jewellery.
    That is okay, but more idiomatic would be:

    • Last Saturday, there were many people shopping at Henrys Jewellery.


    :D

  3. #13
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    So, is it correct to use the preposition "at" in the sentence?

    I saw a robbery which took place/take place at Henrys Jewellery.
    You use which with took but not with take:

    • I saw a robbery which took place at Henrys Jewellery.
      I saw a robbery take place at Henrys Jewellery.


    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    What about the preposition used in the following sentence. Is it correct? Thanks again for helping! ^o^

    Last Saturday, there were many people shopping in the Henrys Jewellery.
    That is okay, but more idiomatic would be:

    • Last Saturday, there were many people shopping at Henrys Jewellery.


    :D
    I agree with you Ron, Because this robbery took place in the past, "which took place" is correct. In AE, we would tend to use 'that" instead of "which" here, because it is a restrictive clause.

    "Which" and "that" have no natural number. They take their number from their antecedents. Either can take a plural or singular verb in the third person present tense.

    The graduation program, which takes place every year, was held on June 1.

    Graduation programs, which take place every year, are held in the summer.

  4. #14
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    So, is it correct to use the preposition "at" in the sentence?

    I saw a robbery which took place/take place at Henrys Jewellery.
    You use which with took but not with take:

    • I saw a robbery which took place at Henrys Jewellery.
      I saw a robbery take place at Henrys Jewellery.


    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    What about the preposition used in the following sentence. Is it correct? Thanks again for helping! ^o^

    Last Saturday, there were many people shopping in the Henrys Jewellery.
    That is okay, but more idiomatic would be:

    • Last Saturday, there were many people shopping at Henrys Jewellery.


    :D
    I agree with you Ron, Because this robbery took place in the past, "which took place" is correct. In AE, we would tend to use 'that" instead of "which" here, because it is a restrictive clause.

    "Which" and "that" have no natural number. They take their number from their antecedents. Either can take a plural or singular verb in the third person present tense.

    The graduation program, which takes place every year, was held on June 1.

    Graduation programs, which take place every year, are held in the summer.
    Thanks a bunch!

    :D

  5. #15
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    So, is it correct to use the preposition "at" in the sentence?

    I saw a robbery which took place/take place at Henrys Jewellery.
    You use which with took but not with take:

    • I saw a robbery which took place at Henrys Jewellery.
      I saw a robbery take place at Henrys Jewellery.


    Quote Originally Posted by Helped Wanted
    What about the preposition used in the following sentence. Is it correct? Thanks again for helping! ^o^

    Last Saturday, there were many people shopping in the Henrys Jewellery.
    That is okay, but more idiomatic would be:

    • Last Saturday, there were many people shopping at Henrys Jewellery.


    :D
    I agree with you Ron, Because this robbery took place in the past, "which took place" is correct. In AE, we would tend to use 'that" instead of "which" here, because it is a restrictive clause.

    "Which" and "that" have no natural number. They take their number from their antecedents. Either can take a plural or singular verb in the third person present tense.

    The graduation program, which takes place every year, was held on June 1.

    Graduation programs, which take place every year, are held in the summer.
    Thanks a bunch!

    :D
    You're welcome. Thanks for the homophone correction. Where is the edit button in this joint?

  6. #16
    RonBee's Avatar
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    On the right, at the top of each post is Reply, Quote, Edit, X (for delete), and IP.

  7. #17
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    On the right, at the top of each post is Reply, Quote, Edit, X (for delete), and IP.
    It wasn't there and then it reappeared. Strange.

  8. #18
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    On the right, at the top of each post is Reply, Quote, Edit, X (for delete), and IP.
    It wasn't there and then it reappeared. Strange.
    Funny things happen in cyberspace.

    :wink:

  9. #19
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    On the right, at the top of each post is Reply, Quote, Edit, X (for delete), and IP.
    It wasn't there and then it reappeared. Strange.
    Funny things happen in cyberspace.

    :wink:
    Amen that!

  10. #20
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Both funny haha and funny peculiar.

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