Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Hiya Raymond's Avatar
    Hiya Raymond is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    88
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    The Emphatic Pattern is included in the English exam of Chinese high school,but I'm not sure if we are learning the pedant English.

    The origianl sentence: My father did the experiment in the lab yesterday evening.
    Emphasizing subject: It was my father who did the experiment in the lab yesterday evening.
    Emphasizing object: It was the experiment that my father did in the lab yesterday evening.
    Emphasizing time: It was yesterday evening that my father did the experiment in the lab.
    Emphasizing place: It was in the lab that my father did the experiment yesterday evening.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,054
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    I don't think you should use the phrase "the pedant English." You might hurt our feelings.

    But that apart, I think you are receiving very good and clear teaching on the matter of emphasis.

  3. #3
    tzfujimino's Avatar
    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,792
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    Hello, Hiya Raymond.

    As for 'cleft sentences', Michael Swan writes:

    "They are useful in writing (because we cannot use intonation for emphasis in written language), but they are also common in speech."
    (Practical English Usage Third Edition page 106)

    I hope it helps.

  4. #4
    Hiya Raymond's Avatar
    Hiya Raymond is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    88
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    Is 'apart' a adverb in the phrase of 'but that apart'? Is that a shortened phrase?

    Thank you very much for your answers!

  5. #5
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,054
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    Apart is indeed an adverb. You could also say "Apart from that."

  6. #6
    Hiya Raymond's Avatar
    Hiya Raymond is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    88
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    Could a adverb modify a noun,or something else?

  7. #7
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,054
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is 'The Emphatic Pattern' common in colloquial English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hiya Raymond View Post
    Could a adverb modify a noun,or something else?
    Of course not. Don't be silly. When we are faced with a construction such as "so fun" we are forced to conclude that fun has morphed from a noun into an adjective, not that the fundamental rules of grammar have changed

Similar Threads

  1. colloquial English and English in common use?
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Aug-2012, 17:55
  2. present emphatic & past emphatic
    By Mahmona in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2011, 15:47
  3. [Grammar] which sentence pattern is more common?
    By Heidi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2010, 08:26
  4. colloquial english
    By carlebo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2008, 10:09
  5. COLLOQUIAL ENGLISH
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Mar-2004, 15:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •