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Thread: Get/Get to

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    #1

    Get/Get to

    Hi.
    I would like to ask what part of speech the word "home" is in the sentence below.
    "After three hours walking, I finally got home."
    Is it a noun or an adverb? Is it correct to say "After three hours walking, I finally got to my home." and would it be still correct to say "After three hours walking, I finally got the lake."? Or is "After three hours walking, I finally got to the lake." the only correct way to say it? If they both are possible which one is more preferable? Do they both mean exactly the same thing?
    Last edited by Mr.Lucky_One; 23-Jul-2013 at 20:28.

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    #2

    Re: Get/Get to

    "To the lake" is the only correct way. If you "got the lake" it would mean the lake was now your property. After Grandpa died I got the lake in his will.

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    #3

    Re: Get/Get to

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "To the lake" is the only correct way. If you "got the lake" it would mean the lake was now your property. After Grandpa died I got the lake in his will.
    Thanks. I am a little bit confused with the following.
    get - definition of get by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia. - Here it is given analogical example (transitive verb/point 5.a). Is "home" an adverb in that example and in mine? I do think that it is. But as far as I know adverb may not be a direct object whereas transitive verb always need have one.

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    #4

    Re: Get/Get to

    If you forced me to choose among traditional terms, I would say "home" is a direct object of "get" in this case. If it's transitive, it needs an object.

    But, "home" is a special case. You can't "get work" or "get restaurant" or "get airport."

    So, I'd be more inclined to define "get home" as a phrasal verb

  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Get/Get to

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Lucky_One View Post
    Thanks. I am a little bit confused with the following.
    get - definition of get by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia. - Here it is given analogical example (transitive verb/point 5.a). Is "home" an adverb in that example and in mine? I do think that it is. But as far as I know adverb may not be a direct object whereas transitive verb always need have one.
    It's funny that I guessed you were Russian without even looking at Member Info (no offence), because you, like my students, want to understand WHY the English say it, you are not satisfied with just trying to memorize WHAT THEY NORMALLY SAY. (I also have such a habit, but try to get rid of it).
    In your example 5. get = arrive at, so the preposition is there, "inside" the verb get already. The verb "get" is not transitive in this context, so the dictionary is a bit wrong, I think. The best thing we can do, though, is not to think about verbs being transitive or intransitive, but concentrate on the phrase itself - "to get home" and try to memorize it as it is.
    Last edited by englishhobby; 25-Dec-2013 at 18:35.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Get/Get to

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    If you forced me to choose among traditional terms, I would say "home" is a direct object of "get" in this case. If it's transitive, it needs an object.

    But, "home" is a special case. You can't "get work" or "get restaurant" or "get airport."

    So, I'd be more inclined to define "get home" as a phrasal verb
    I agree that "home" is a special case, but that is because it acts as adverb there. It does also with "arrive", "go", "travel", "return", etc. I would not call it a phrasal verb.

    See home as an adverb: home - definition of home by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

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