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  1. #1
    Szymon is offline Junior Member
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    Default Could you tell me the difference? Please.

    There is a sentence:
    "As soon as you possess something, which is what the examination of the association of your mind is, it becomes fearful"

    And I don`t know how to understand the sentence when the word `what` (after `which is`) is included there.

    It is easy to understand if it were like this:
    As soon as you possess something, which is the examination of the association of your mind, it becomes fearful.

    But I`m afraid those two versions are not the same, are they?
    Please help. Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Could you tell me the difference? Please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Szymon
    There is a sentence:
    "As soon as you possess something, which is what the examination of the association of your mind is, it becomes fearful"
    And I don`t know how to understand the sentence when the word `what` (after `which is`) is included there.
    It is easy to understand if it were like this:
    As soon as you possess something, which is the examination of the association of your mind, it becomes fearful.
    But I`m afraid those two versions are not the same, are they?
    Please help. Thank you.
    Hi Szymon,

    I have to confess I find it difficult to understand the meaning of your example sentence too . Is it a translation from a non-English language?

    Perhaps it would help to simplify the detail in order to concentrate on the structure. Let me re-write the sentences in essential form:

    A) "As soon as you possess X, which is what Y is, it becomes fearful."
    OR your alternative
    B) "As soon as you possess X, which is Y, it becomes fearful."

    OK. A) would mean that "You possess X" is equivalent to Y. B) would mean that "X" is equivalent to "Y".

    So if the original sentence makes sense, it would presumably mean that "possessing something is the same as examining what your mind associates with it, and both make you fearful of that something."

    Your sentence would mean "possessing the examination of the associations in your mind makes you fearful of that examination."

    That's my best guess anyway. Frankly, neither version makes much sense to me, and my opinion is that the original sentence is badly written.

  3. #3
    Szymon is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Could you tell me the difference? Please.

    Hi Coffa and thanks for explanation, but - the text was taken from an American book, anyway I`m getting what you have told me about my version of the sentence and its meaning, and generally about that strange `statement structure`, thank you.
    Last edited by Szymon; 05-Mar-2006 at 21:45.

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