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    #1

    In the line? At the line? During the line?

    Hi,

    Which one is correct: They met in/on/at the line of passport control at the airport.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: In the line? At the line? During the line?

    not a teacher

    In the sense of "line" = "queue", I would say "in the line".
    There may be regional differences with this.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: In the line? At the line? During the line?

    In BrE, "They met in the queue for immigration" or "They met in the queue for passport control".
    In AmE (I believe), "They met in the line ..."
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #4

    Re: In the line? At the line? During the line?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In BrE, "They met in the queue for immigration" or "They met in the queue for passport control".
    In AmE (I believe), "They met in the line ..."
    You meant that we cannot say "...of passport control at the airport."?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: In the line? At the line? During the line?

    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishLearner1990 View Post
    You meant that we cannot say "...of passport control at the airport."?
    Yes. "The queue of passport control" is incorrect. We queue for a service, in/at a building and at​ a desk/counter.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #6

    Re: In the line? At the line? During the line?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In BrE, "They met in the queue for immigration" or "They met in the queue for passport control".
    In AmE (I believe), "They met in the line ..."
    Can I say "They met up in the queue ......." instead of "They met in the queue ...................." ?

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    #7

    Re: In the line? At the line? During the line?

    Quote Originally Posted by ahmed2th View Post
    Can I say "They met up in the queue ......." instead of "They met in the queue ...................." ?
    You can but it has a slightly different connotation. "They met up" suggests that they arranged to meet there (and a queue would be a strange place to meet up). "The met in the queue..." means that they encountered each other for the first time there.

    They met in the queue for passport control and now, twelve years later, they have four children and are about to celebrate their tenth wedding anniversary.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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