Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Olympian is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    454
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default "She spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with the rules of her job."

    Hello,

    this is from the news story about the recent high speed train crash in Spain.

    The driver has access to two phones: one fixed in the driver's cabin and the other a cellphone. She said there is no contact by computer in the form of emails or messages. She spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with the rules of her job

    I have usually seen something like - 'spoke on condition of anonymity because s/he was not authorized to speak..', or 'spoke on condition of anonymity citing the sensitivity of the issue', and so on. This is the first time I read the above sentence (in red). I think she is not authorized to speak, but from the English meaning point of view, does the sentence also mean - 'she can speak anonymously?'

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Gillnetter is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1,696
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "She spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with the rules of her job."

    Quote Originally Posted by Olympian View Post
    Hello,

    this is from the news story about the recent high speed train crash in Spain.
    The driver has access to two phones: one fixed in the driver's cabin and the other a cellphone. She said there is no contact by computer in the form of emails or messages. She spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with the rules of her job

    I have usually seen something like - 'spoke on condition of anonymity because s/he was not authorized to speak..', or 'spoke on condition of anonymity citing the sensitivity of the issue', and so on. This is the first time I read the above sentence (in red). I think she is not authorized to speak, but from the English meaning point of view, does the sentence also mean - 'she can speak anonymously?'

    Thank you
    I would say that the rules of her job require that she not disclose who she is. In other words, she can speak but cannot identify herself.

  3. #3
    Olympian is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    454
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "She spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with the rules of her job."

    @Gilnetter, thank you. I take it that this is different from not being authorized to speak at all. At least she can speak but not give our her name, whereas when they are not authorized to speak, they are doing so anonymously, but that is against their rules.

  4. #4
    renard's Avatar
    renard is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    40
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "She spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with the rules of her job."

    This statement is used frequently when an employee is not permitted to speak at all, and is only speaking to the press on the condition of anonymity - in other words, she will only speak if her job cannot know it was her.

Similar Threads

  1. who spoke on condition that he not be identified
    By anhnha in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2013, 06:54
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23-Mar-2012, 12:26
  3. [General] "Localized to the point of anonymity"
    By Olympian in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2010, 09:15
  4. "n accordance with" vs "n line with" ?
    By Tom W. in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-Mar-2009, 02:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk