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  1. #1
    hancy is offline Newbie
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    Default Difference i am to go and i have to go

    Sir,

    I would like to know what is the basic difference between

    1) i am to go and i have to go
    2) He is gone and he has gone


    Regards,

    Hancy

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    I would say the use of 'have to' implies obligation, I have to go = I must go. The only time I can imagine using 'I am to go' would be when listing instructions given by someone else, eg:
    So, to get to the post-office, I'm to go straight on, take the first on the left etc.
    As for he is gone, I can't think of a modern day usage - in what context have you seen it?

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    I am to go = it's inevitable, because of schedules, etc, but doesn't sound forced.
    He is gone- more colloquial form of 'has gone', unless it's an adjective meaning he's mad, drunk, etc.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    But does anybody say 'he is gone', even colloquially? One hears 'he's gone' but the apostrophe replaces the ha in has, I would have thought. It doesn't mean the person speaking would have said 'he is gone' if saying the phrase in full.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    Welcome, orme.

    What about?

    Max: My dog was hit by a car. Please help.
    Vet: Let's take a look.
    Max: Will he be OK, Doc?
    Vet: Sorry. He's gone / He is gone. <He died>

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    Welcome, hancy.

    Additionally,

    1) I am [supposed] to go.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    I've thought about it, Casiopea, and here's what I think: I think that when the vet says 'He's gone', it would be 'he has gone' in full. He has gone to doggie heaven (or wherever), the same as 'he's died' in full is 'he has died'. You would never say 'he is died'.

    I like your 'I am (supposed) to go'.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    Thanks, orme.

    But . . . what about?

    [1] He has gone (for the weekend); i.e., he has left.
    [2] He is gone.; i.e., he no longer exists.

  9. #9
    dihen is offline Member
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    What about "He's gone!" in a situation like "He suddenly disappeared (ran away to somewhere), and I can't find him right now!"?
    Last edited by dihen; 06-Mar-2006 at 16:29.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Difference i am to go and i have to go

    Quote Originally Posted by dihen
    What about "He's gone!" in a situation like "He suddenly disappeared (ran away to somewhere), and I can't find him right now!"?
    Hmm. Let's check it out:

    [1] He has gone; He has disappeared.
    [2] He is gone; He is no longer here (in this room).

    I'd say you've provided us with great examples. "He's" could be both "he is" and "he has".

    Kewl.

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