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  1. #1
    Pierce111 is offline Member
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    Default Translating full name

    My name and sure name is hard for pronouncing for foraigners. I have to contact with people from abroad in my job. I would like to mek it easier for them to talk to me. Would it be appropriate to translate for them my full name at propose them to use this instead of my real one?
    After translation my full name would look like this: Kristof Bush.
    Would it be ok to write in an email in place of signature the fomula:

    Krzysiek Krzak
    (translated full name: Kristopher Bush)

    ?
    Last edited by Pierce111; 11-Aug-2013 at 13:36.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    Quote Originally Posted by Pierce111 View Post
    My name and sure name surname is are hard for foreigners to pronounce.pronouncing for foraigners. I have to contact with people from abroad in my job. I would like to mek make it easier for them to talk to me. Would it be appropriate to translate for them my full name for them at and propose suggest them to that they use this instead of my real one?

    After translation, my full name would sound be Kristof Bush.

    Would it be ok OK to write in an email in place of the signature the formula:

    Krzysiek Krzak
    (translated full name: Kristopher Bush)
    No, it would not be sensible to do that. Your name is your name. There is no need for anyone to know that the word "krzak" translates to "bush". Sign your name normally. The simplest thing to do would be to suggest to people when they meet you that they call you "Chris". That's a nice contraction of "Christopher" but there is no need to do anything at all to your surname. It would also become very confusing if half your contacts thought you were called Christopher Bush and the rest thought you were called Krysiek Krzak.

    Please note my corrections to your post. Be careful with your spelling. Some of the errors were very basic - I am sure that you know how to spell the word "make", for example.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    renard's Avatar
    renard is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    I would keep your surname and use Kris(topher) [original surname] instead. Difficult surnames are not uncommon and it is unusual to translate a surname.

  4. #4
    Pierce111 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    So

    "Kristopher Krzak"

    would be OK?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    If you do not mind being called Kristopher, then yes, it sounds just fine! Krzak, although probably pronounced incorrectly, is not difficult for English speakers. Krzysiek, I admit, is a difficult consonant cluster for an English speaker.

  6. #6
    Pierce111 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post

    Please note my corrections to your post. Be careful with your spelling. Some of the errors were very basic - I am sure that you know how to spell the word "make", for example.
    Thank you for your corrections. When I write in "fast mode" I often lose some letters : ) .

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    Quote Originally Posted by renard View Post
    If you do not mind being called Kristopher, then yes, it sounds just fine! Krzak, although probably pronounced incorrectly, is not difficult for English speakers. Krzysiek, I admit, is a difficult consonant cluster for an English speaker.
    I still wouldn't actually call it your "name translation". At work, I think your emails should end with your name, regardless of what your name is. You could add a PS to your emails, with something like "I realise my name is hard to pronounce. Feel free to call me Chris when we speak!"
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    You could also consider changing your name officially if you keep having problems with this. Kristof Krazak works for me.
    How, in fact, do you say 'Krzak'?

  9. #9
    Pierce111 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Translating full name

    Kshak

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