Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like

    This is not right, is it?

    I am having a disagreement with my co-worker about this he feels that this correct, and I disgree:

    If you hadn't of said, I wouldn't of noticed.

    Is this right? and why not?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Wink Re: This is not right, is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by ugp
    I am having a disagreement with my co-worker about this he feels that this correct, and I disgree:
    If you hadn't of said, I wouldn't of noticed.
    Is this right? and why not?


    I DON'T THINKS SO .I THINK THE CORRECT ONE IS (IF YOU HADN'T SAIDTO ME I WOULDN'T NOTICED)









    9

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    I think it should be:

    If you hadn't of said I wouldn't have noticed.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    65
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: This is not right, is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by ugp
    I am having a disagreement with my co-worker about this he feels that this correct, and I disgree:
    If you hadn't of said, I wouldn't of noticed.
    Is this right? and why not?
    Ugp, one thing that`s DEFINATELY wrong is the use of the word "of". It should be "I wouldn`t HAVE noticed". Also, I`d add something to the sentence, like this:
    "If you hadn`t of said so, I wouldn`t have noticed". Or maybe: "If you hadn`t of said anything, I wouldn`t have noticed". Make sense to you? Hope so.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    The correct sentence should be: "If you hadn't have said, I wouldn't have noticed."

    The confusion is due to the fact that English speakers almost always SAY the sentence above with a double contraction: "If you hadn't 've said, I wouldn't 've noticed." Say it quickly a few times and you'll discover why.

    Listen to the double contraction on a tape and you'll find it sounds remarkably like "If you hadn't of said, I wouldn't of noticed."

    That's why the myth has arisen that this sentence is "correct".

  6. #6
    joenuts's Avatar
    joenuts is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    44
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffa
    The correct sentence should be: "If you hadn't have said, I wouldn't have noticed."
    The confusion is due to the fact that English speakers almost always SAY the sentence above with a double contraction: "If you hadn't 've said, I wouldn't 've noticed." Say it quickly a few times and you'll discover why.
    Listen to the double contraction on a tape and you'll find it sounds remarkably like "If you hadn't of said, I wouldn't of noticed."
    That's why the myth has arisen that this sentence is "correct".
    Can't we drop 'have'? Isn't the past perfect form enough?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by joenuts
    Can't we drop 'have'? Isn't the past perfect form enough?
    I'm not quite sure what you mean. The past perfect tense of "to have" is "had have", giving "If you had not have said..."

  8. #8
    spenser is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    53
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    In my book, it should have been, "If you hadn't said (that), I wouldn't have noticed"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffa
    I'm not quite sure what you mean. The past perfect tense of "to have" is "had have", giving "If you had not have said..."
    We need the past perfect of "to say", which is "had said". "Had have said" would be the past perfect perfect, and as far as I know English doesn't have that tense. Spenser's book gives the only possible correct version.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: This is not right, is it?

    In fact, now that I think about it: "had have", whatever it is, is not the past perfect tense of "to have". The past perfect is formed from these two elements:

    the past tense of "to have", which is "had";
    the past participle of the main verb.

    The past participle of "to have" is also "had", giving "had had", thus: "If you had not had said", which I have never heard a native speaker say. I can't think of any tense formed with "to have" plus the basic form of the main verb.

    Spenser's book gives the only possible correct version.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •