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  1. MrBug's Avatar
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    #1

    "Illusion" without an article?

    I am reading a book and it's called Utopia by Lincoln Child. I have found a passage where you have the word "illusion" with an indefinite article, as expected. However, in the next sentence there is "illusion" without an article. How come? Could you explain that? Here is the text:

    Of course, the kid had no idea he was ascending through a cylindrical screen, displaying a digital image beamed from two dozen projectors onto the fiber-optic lights of the cityscape. It was an illusion, of course. At Utopia, illusion was everything.
    I have made a photo from that book, so you can see it's like that in the book.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Illusion" without an article?

    The first use of "illusion" referred to an actual illusion. The second use referred to illusion in general. An article is not used in the second case.

  3. MrBug's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "Illusion" without an article?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The first use of "illusion" referred to an actual illusion. The second use referred to illusion in general. An article is not used in the second case.
    Could you explain it a little more and give me some examples where illusion is without an article (and include links to these examples if possible)

    I thought that it's aways with an article and never with no article.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Illusion" without an article?

    "Illusion" can be both countable and uncountable.

    That illusion was great.
    This illusion is better than yours.
    Illusion forms a large part of a magic show.

    The last sentence wouldn't make sense as "An illusion forms a large part of a magic show" - that suggests there is just one illusion in each show. You could argue that "Illusions form a large part of magic shows" and that is true but using the general term "Illusion" is better.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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