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  1. #1
    pinkie9 is offline Member
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    Default consult with (only North American English?)

    consult - Definition and pronunciation | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com
    Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says as follows:

    consult (VERB)
    1 [transitive, intransitive] to go to somebody for information or advice
    consult somebody If the pain continues, consult your doctor.
    consult somebody about something
    Have you consulted your lawyer about this?a consulting engineer (= one who has expert knowledge and gives advice)
    (North American English) consult with somebody (about/on something) Consult with your physician about possible treatments.

    Is "consult with somebody" used only in Norh American English?
    If so, how do British people (and other English native speakers) say "Consult with your physician about possible treatments"?
    Just "Consult your physician..."?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: consult with (only North American English?)

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkie9 View Post
    If so, how do British people (and other English native speakers) say "Consult with your physician about possible treatments"?
    Just "Consult your physician..."?
    Yes, but we'd probably say 'doctor' rather than 'physician'.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: consult with (only North American English?)

    Note that in AmE, we would also say "consult your physician." That is, the "with" is optional in that type of sentence.

  4. #4
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    I agree with SoothingDave that consult with is commonly heard in AmE. But in my opinion it is inferior to the simple consult. We in the Great White North prefer to omit the superfluous with.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: consult with (only North American English?)

    We generally "discuss" treatment options with our doctor. "To consult" in medical terms is what the doctor does, not what the patient does.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: consult with (only North American English?)

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Yes, but we'd probably say 'doctor' rather than 'physician'.
    I'm slightly surprised by that, as the British adopted the term "Doctor" as a synonym for physician from the Americans, according to a British source. I forget where I saw it, but it has to do with the "Bachelor of Medicine" as opposed to the M.D., and the "new" tendency to call B.M.'s "doctor" in the UK. Or maybe I misunderstood what I read.

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: consult with (only North American English?)

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    I'm slightly surprised by that, as the British adopted the term "Doctor" as a synonym for physician from the Americans, according to a British source. I forget where I saw it, but it has to do with the "Bachelor of Medicine" as opposed to the M.D., and the "new" tendency to call B.M.'s "doctor" in the UK. Or maybe I misunderstood what I read.
    We have, for as long as I can remember, always called our GP (General Practioner) 'Doctor' or, if we use his name, 'Doctor Surname'. If we refer to him, he is 'the Doctor' or, sometimes 'Dr Surname'. Few of us are aware that our GP holds an MB/MB and BS/ChB rather than an MD.

    If our doctor refers us to a hospital for treatment, we refer to the person who deals with us 'the specialist' or, if such be his rank, 'the consultant. If we address him/her , we still use 'Doctor', though if we add his/her name, it's 'Dr Surname' for physicians and 'Mr/Ms Surname' for surgeons.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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