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Thread: Doing a run

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    #1

    Doing a run

    Can you say that you're doing, say, at least a mile run a day this month, e.g. I'm doing a three mile run a day this month.

    Thanks

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Doing a run

    Yes, but there needs to be a hyphen between 'three' and 'mile'

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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Yes, but there needs to be a hyphen between 'three' and 'mile'
    With the greatest respect, I think there does not. In my opinion/observation, these hyphens are passing away.

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    #4

    Re: Doing a run

    ...these hyphens are passing away.
    Over my dead body!

    The hyphens clarify the meaning.

    'I'm doing three mile runs every day this week (I'm doing three separate one-mile runs)' and 'I'm doing three-mile runs every day...(I'm doing a three-mile run every day)'.


    'I look after three year-old children.' (There are three children who are each one year old.)

    'I look after three-year-old children.' (There are an unspecified number of children who are each three years old.)

    Rover

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    #5

    Re: Doing a run

    Thanks for your replies. It seems I was correct to begin with (no hyphen needed between 'three' and 'mile').

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    [COLOR=#333333]

    Over my dead body!

    The hyphens clarify the meaning.

    'I'm doing three mile runs every day this week (I'm doing three separate one-mile runs)' and 'I'm doing three-mile runs every day...(I'm doing a three-mile run every day)'.


    'I look after three year-old children.' (There are three children who are each one year old.)

    'I look after three-year-old children.' (There are an unspecified number of children who are each three years old.)

    Rover
    The use of a hyphen does not clarify my example.

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    #6

    Re: Doing a run

    You need the hyphen.

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    #7

    Re: Doing a run

    Not a teacher!

    Quote Originally Posted by eyefordetail View Post
    Thanks for your replies. It seems I was correct to begin with (no hyphen needed between 'three' and 'mile').

    The use of a hyphen does not clarify my example.
    Maybe a look in Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage" will remove all doubt that a hyphen is required in your example:

    "386 noun + noun (2): advanced points

    5 measurement: a five-litre can

    Noun + noun is used in measurements with a number before the first noun. The number is usually joined to the first noun by a hyphen (-)."

    Some of the examples given: "a six-pound chicken". "a three-mile walk", "ten two-hour lessons".


    Personally, I like to do a run, but I don't think it is a good idea to do a runner in because I don't want to have to do a runner. - This has nothing to do with the original question, but I thought it is a nice example of how a slight change of words can totally change the meaning of an expression (from running to killing to running away).

    TomUK
    Last edited by TomUK; 03-Sep-2013 at 23:53. Reason: Can't even copy from a book.

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    #8

    Re: Doing a run

    Are you sure about "a three mile-walk", Tom?

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    #9

    Re: Doing a run

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Are you sure about "a three mile-walk", Tom?
    Thank you for pointing this out. I have corrected it now.

    TomUK

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    #10
    You should be cautious about coming to that conclusion. I stand by my opinion but it is only one opinion.

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