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Thread: an avalanche

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    #1

    an avalanche

    What verbs do you generally associate with an avalanche?

    The ones I have found are these two: to break off and to come off. But which one is more used in this kind of sentence?

    - An avalanche has broken/come off the mountain.

    Thank you very much.

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    #2

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    What verbs do you generally associate with an avalanche?

    The ones I have found are these two: to break off and to come off. But which one is more used in this kind of sentence?

    - An avalanche has broken/come off the mountain.

    Thank you very much.
    We don't usually follow "avalanche" with a verb. We simply say "There has been an avalanche" or "There was a terrible avalanche yesterday on Mount Cristobal".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We don't usually follow "avalanche" with a verb. We simply say "There has been an avalanche" or "There was a terrible avalanche yesterday on Mount Cristobal".
    Got it, but if you should define the action that an avalanche does, which would you use? Do you think there's in English a verb to mean the movement done by an avalanche?

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    #4

    Re: an avalanche

    I suppose it might "cascade" down a mountain, but you would have to use all those words.

    An avalanche cascaded yesterday in Switzerland.
    An avalanche cascaded down a mountain in Switzerland yesterday.

    Note that I am not saying that this is what we naturally say. I would expect to see "There was an avalanche in Switzerland yesterday".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: an avalanche

    The avalanche swept away everything in its path.

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    #6

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    The avalanche swept away everything in its path.
    That's true, but that's not really a verb that describes the essential nature of an avalanche. I agree with ems; we don't have one.

    By the way, dilodi, what's the verb you use in Italian?

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    #7

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    That's true, but that's not really a verb that describes the essential nature of an avalanche.
    OK. 'The avalanche swept down the mountain, destroying everything in its path.'

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    #8

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    OK. 'The avalanche swept down the mountain, destroying everything in its path.'
    Aha! Now "sweep" I like.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    OK. 'The avalanche swept down the mountain, destroying everything in its path.'
    I was thinking along the lines of what other natural disasters do. Volcanoes erupt; bush fires/wild fires burn, a flood inundates. That is, does an avalanche do anything intransitive - a verb that simply means that it happens. An avalanche sweeps? Maybe. In the spirit of volcanoes erupting, what do earthquakes do?
    The point I was making was that transitive verbs describing the effects these natural disasters can cause are not verbs essential to the disaster itself. Yes earthquakes avalanches can sweep down mountains, kill people, bury homes, knock over trees, etc.
    Last edited by Raymott; 07-Sep-2013 at 20:43.

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    #10

    Re: an avalanche

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    That's true, but that's not really a verb that describes the essential nature of an avalanche. I agree with ems; we don't have one.

    By the way, dilodi, what's the verb you use in Italian?
    In Italian we say "staccarsi" which is kind of "to come off": Una valanga si staccata dalla montagna, which would be: An avalanche has come off from the mountain...but I do not know if it sounds well in English.

    Let me know

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