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Thread: How to diagram

  1. #31
    Frank Antonson1 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: How to diagram

    Wow! Very well put.

    I believe that I agree with everything that you said.

    The terminology is so different from mine, but that is ok.

    One of the things that I like about Reed-Kellogg is that there is NO terminology. One still has to understand what is going on to diagram the sentence, but one doesn't have to be tripped up by the terms -- only when discussing the diagram.

    One thing, though, that I would say. The diagrams of Reed-Kellogg are not about "parts of speech" but rather about "parts of sentences". Not what can be called "morphology" but rather about what should be called "syntax." In Reed-Kellogg the terminology is already completely distinct. I continually was distraught when I heard American English teachers refer to the "predicate" of a clause as the "verb". A predicate is always and only made up of a verb or verbs, but verbs are not always predicates -- e.g. gerunds. But this is still more terminology.

    I taught beside another teacher who would ask her students "What are the subject and verb in this sentence". Or worse, "What are the noun and the verb in this sentence." !!!!! How could her students EVER keep it straight? Of course a dictionary give information about morphology -- parts of speech etc.; but of course not about parts of sentences.

    Your knowledge of grammar is very impressive.

    If you haven't already, I would again urge you to look at the link I put in my description of my video that you DID look at. I mean the first one given, I believe. In it I show three or four publications about Reed-Kellogg. I show all the pages of the first little one, which is simple, complete, but out of print.

    That video is titled 1.94.1 Publications about Grammar and Syntax

  2. #32
    Frank Antonson1 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: How to diagram

    Oops. I hope to catch something before somebody else does. I should have said SIMPLE predicates are always and only verbs. Complete predicates can contain all of the parts of speech. Also, a simple predicate can be compound, in which case, the conjunction making it compound could (and probably should) be considered part of the simple predicate.

    Sorry about that.

  3. #33
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    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: How to diagram

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson1 View Post
    Oops. I hope to catch something before somebody else does. I should have said SIMPLE predicates are always and only verbs. Complete predicates can contain all of the parts of speech. Also, a simple predicate can be compound, in which case, the conjunction making it compound could (and probably should) be considered part of the simple predicate.

    Sorry about that.
    No problem. I understood what you meant. When I say that Reed-Kellogg is based on parts of speech, it is because of the different structures (types of lines) used for conjunctions, prepositions, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, nouns, etc. The terminology may not be used, but one has to know what the words are to correctly represent them graphically.

    I have very much enjoyed this discussion.

  4. #34
    Frank Antonson1 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: How to diagram

    Me too. And I respect your knowledge. It is, however, with Reed-Kellogg, very important not to mix morphology with syntax. The types of lines apply to the use within the sentence , i.e. syntax. I believe that there are about 25 parts of sentences (syntax), as opposed to the standard idea of 8 parts of speech (morphology).

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