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Thread: To have yet to

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    #1

    To have yet to

    Hi,
    I am new to this forum. I am an avid student of the American English grammar and its usage,focusing primarily on the correct use of formal English. In the future,I will be seeking answers for many of my grammar questions related to the proper identifications of modifiers and the word or word groups they modify,preferably from English professors at well-regarded colleges or universities.


    That said,my very first question I shall post to this forum is the proper labeling of the phrase " to have yet to". Is it considered an auxiliary or helping verb which conjugates with the infinitive form of a main verb? For example,in the sentence "UPS has yet to come",is the phrase "has yet to come" the complete verb phrase of the sentence,with the auxiliary being "has yet to" and the main verb "come"?
    And what about the phrase "to be yet to" as in "I am yet to be convinced of the benefits of Yoga",or as in "He is yet to start his career"? Is it acceptable in formal English as an interchangeable form of "to have yet to",or is it non-standard or informal usage?


    Thanks in advance for any proper response,
    Gianni

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: To have yet to

    Welcome to the forum, Gianni X. Wong.

    Try to relax a little. We are happy to deal with one small point at a time.
    That said,my very first question I shall post to this forum is the proper labeling of the phrase " to have yet to".
    There is no such 'phrase' as to have yet to.
    For example,in the sentence "UPS has yet to come",is the phrase "has yet to come" the complete verb phrase of the sentence,with the auxiliary being "has yet to" and the main verb "come"?
    I'm afraid there is not much point in discussing this, because the sentence 'UPS has yet to come' is, in most contexts, not natural English. It makes sense only if both parties in the dialogue know that UPS is a delivery service that, in this context, is expected to come.

    I think we'd better wait for comments from others before we look at the other parts of your post

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: To have yet to

    Quote Originally Posted by Gianni X. Wong View Post
    Hi,
    I am new to this forum. I am an avid student of the American English grammar and its usage,focusing primarily on the correct use of formal English. In the future,I will be seeking answers for many of my grammar questions related to the proper identifications of modifiers and the word or word groups they modify,preferably from English professors at well-regarded colleges or universities.


    That said,my very first question I shall post to this forum is the proper labeling of the phrase " to have yet to". Is it considered an auxiliary or helping verb which conjugates with the infinitive form of a main verb? For example,in the sentence "UPS has yet to come",is the phrase "has yet to come" the complete verb phrase of the sentence,with the auxiliary being "has yet to" and the main verb "come"?
    And what about the phrase "to be yet to" as in "I am yet to be convinced of the benefits of Yoga",or as in "He is yet to start his career"? Is it acceptable in formal English as an interchangeable form of "to have yet to",or is it non-standard or informal usage?


    Thanks in advance for any proper response,
    Gianni
    I think you are over-complicating the sentence. Try taking the word "yet" out of the sentences. It is an adverb, and, while not insignificant, it is not ultimately important in parsing the other words. What would you say about "UPS is to come" or "He is to start his career?

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    #4

    Re: To have yet to

    Dear 5jj,
    The phrase "have yet to" is widely accepted as standard,formal English in America;and according to my studies both at the intermediate and collegiate level,the sentence "UPS has yet to come" is both "natural"(to quote you) and formal English;in fact,it's regarded as highly formal,even more so than the more common expression "UPS has not come yet". You can cross reference my analysis with any accredited college professor,and he(or she?) will agree with my observations. All I wanted to know was whether the phrase "have yet to come" is considered as an auxiliary verb,for I already learned everything else there is to know about this expression.

    Sincerely,
    Gianni

    Sincerely,
    Jian

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    #5

    Re: To have yet to

    Quote Originally Posted by Gianni X. Wong View Post
    Dear 5jj,
    The phrase "have yet to" is widely accepted as standard,formal English in America;and according to my studies both at the intermediate and collegiate level,the sentence "UPS has yet to come" is both "natural"(to quote you) and formal English;in fact,it's regarded as highly formal,even more so than the more common expression "UPS has not come yet". You can cross reference my analysis with any accredited college professor,and he(or she?) will agree with my observations. All I wanted to know was whether the phrase "have yet to come" is considered as an auxiliary verb,for I already learned everything else there is to know about this expression.

    Sincerely,
    Gianni

    Sincerely,
    Jian
    Excuse me for interrupting your knowledge fest. Please continue.

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    #6

    Re: To have yet to

    Gianni, leave a space after a comma and a semicolon.

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    #7

    Re: To have yet to

    Quote Originally Posted by Gianni X. Wong View Post
    All I wanted to know was whether the phrase "have yet to come" is considered as an auxiliary verb,for I already learned everything else there is to know about this expression.
    My knowledge and experience are clearly vastly inferior to yours. After 65+ years of speaking the language, and many years of studying and teaching it, I have always, clearly misguidedly, thought of 'yet' as an adverb. MikeNewYork is clearly as ignorant as I - as are nearly all the accredited college professors in the world. I feel mortified.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 11-Sep-2013 at 12:50. Reason: typo

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    #8

    Re: To have yet to

    Be yet to was the more common form for most of the 19th century according to Ngram- have/has yet to have taken off in recent decades. It's a standard form in BrE. I'll leave it to American speakers to answer about AmE.

    Google Ngram Viewer
    http://english.stackexchange.com/que...s-he-is-yet-to

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    #9

    Re: To have yet to

    I would say "UPS hasn't come yet." "Yet to come" seems more like a fixed phrase. Like "the best is yet to come."

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